wot childrens books still haunt your imagination

Matthew

FKA Woebot
Some of it goes back a bit further. So one interesting thing is how English children's literature draws, inevitably I suppose, on the 'matter of England' the mythic deposits . And this pre dates the hippies although it resonated very strongly with the hippies

certainly has roots.

but the "hauntology" generation were mainly processing it through refractions they received of it as children via oddballs in the media.
 

WashYourHands

Well-known member
Reading the Mabinogion as a kid had parts that serve as tripwires into these wtf zones. If its provenance comes from oral traditions of fireside story telling to all ages, it‘s as much a children’s book as an adult one too.

When Bendigeidfran’s head is cut off and buried under the white mound of Bryngwyn/Tower Hill in London, my child-mind lurched into a spiral of horror. It was visceral and a real punch to the guts, balanced by the familiarity of humour and enhanced by pure surrealism.
 

luka

Well-known member
Staff member
certainly has roots.

but the "hauntology" generation were mainly processing it through refractions they received of it as children via oddballs in the media.

Yeah I know but hauntology was awful and best forgotten.
 

version

Who loves ya, baby?
yes, i think that's what it has become sadly. i think thirdform was right about the like options. they're not helpful for me. I started off trying not to use them myself, but then you get them and so you give them etc. and the constant checking also not helpful, dashing off a quick reply. i'll take this on board, cheers.
You can turn them off so you don't get pinged, you know? I turned off all notifications except private messages as soon as we switched to new forum.
 

constant escape

winter withered, warm
You can turn them off so you don't get pinged, you know? I turned off all notifications except private messages as soon as we switched to new forum.
Good to know, think I'll make the switch now too. The Teaching Machine has been getting a little too frisky for comfort.
 

subvert47

I don't fight, I run away
I'm sure Rosemary Sutcliffe has been mentioned here, but worth mentioning again, in the context of books that are myth-laden and immanent with magic, although obviously a bit different from Cowper, Machen and so on in being set in the distant past. I think I only read two or three, which is a shame because she was pretty prolific. I think we've got a copy of one of hers with an Arthurian setting, which I might read after Glastonbury Romance.

Arthur first appears (as Artos the Bear) in The Lantern Bearers (the third book in the Eagle of the Ninth series). And she follows that up with a superb retelling of Arthurian myth in Sword at Sunset, writing it as properly researched actual history.
 

catalog

Well-known member
Most of my ladybirds.



I actually repurchased alot of these about 10 years ago, cos my mum gave away all my own originals when I was at uni.

I didn't mind at the time but now wish I had them. Its swings and roundabouts tho, I got all my cousins old asterix comics.

I can't find the specific aesops fables with the very haunting image, but this is what the second in the series looked like



Colour palette on the interior pages was pretty basic but the quality of the draughtsmanship is excellent



This was another fave, no idea why really. Very odd story



This was one of my favourite of the 'older' ladybirds. I probably read this whole series, but never bothered reading the actual unabridged versions.



These also had really good drawings. This house was always something I liked, a little nest in the mountains

 

IdleRich

IdleRich
Funny I could never get into Kidnapped but I loved Treasure Island.... still like the idea of that kind of world. I saw the other day that it was the 20th (I think) anniversary of The Secret Of Monkey Island which was a game I absolutely loved, did anyone else play that?

 

woops

is not like other people
used to play monkey island, maniac mansion, zac mckracken and the alien mindbenders, leisure suit larry, day of the tentacle, pretty much all the lucas arts games, plus all the space quest series from sierra
 

IdleRich

IdleRich
I just played Monkey Island to be honest... never played Loom which is always mentioned in TSOMI or Indiana Jones which was supposed to be good.
 

IdleRich

IdleRich
I just played Monkey Island to be honest... never played Loom which is always mentioned in TSOMI or Indiana Jones which was supposed to be good.
It was really amazing for me... the spooky island where it starts which is always dark, with the Sword Master and so on... and then the bright island (the Governor's perhaps) etc etc it was like living in a world I'd always loved but not realised I did... although of course it would probably seem incredibly limited compared to what is possible now.
 
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