Bitcoin

luka

Well-known member
Staff member
One glass of champagne in a year is hardly evidence of an obscenely debauched lifestyle is it? Even the frugal are allowed the odd nice thing once in a blue moon aren't they?
Certainly not by your standards!
 

constant escape

winter withered, warm
Well I think I should avoid having my cake and eating it to, which I assume is what you were calling out. And rightfully - for it had slipped past me.
 

IdleRich

IdleRich
Liza went to see her friend yesterday... apparently he ordered some k, Liza had brought some speed and then his flatmate came in with c, mdma, and GHB. Fucking Tuesday night 5th January.
 

IdleRich

IdleRich
Borrowing to invest in a volatile asset eh? Always a great strategy, is there any way you can leverage it further to increase your winnings (or losses obviously)?
 

Leo

Well-known member
Lost Passwords Lock Millionaires Out of Their Bitcoin Fortune

Stefan Thomas, a German-born programmer living in San Francisco, has two guesses left to figure out a password that is worth, as of this week, about $220 million. The password will let him unlock a small hard drive, known as an IronKey, which contains the private keys to a digital wallet that holds 7,002 Bitcoin. While the price of Bitcoin dropped sharply on Monday, it is still up more than 50 percent from just a month ago, when it passed its previous all-time high of around $20,000.

The problem is that Mr. Thomas years ago lost the paper where he wrote down the password for his IronKey, which gives users 10 guesses before it seizes up and encrypts its contents forever. He has since tried eight of his most commonly used password formulations — to no avail.

Gabriel Abed, 34, an entrepreneur from Barbados, lost around 800 Bitcoin — now worth around $25 million — when a colleague reformatted a laptop that contained the private keys to a Bitcoin wallet in 2011.
 

IdleRich

IdleRich
When you have like fifty different things that need passwords and they are constantly asking you to update them with increasingly stringent criteria it becomes a huge security risk cos there is no way that you can remember all of them if they're different so you end up re-using ones or else you keep forgetting them and having to prove it's you and so you end up making it easier to do that. I also really resent having to make stupid things like, I dunno, my password for the squash club, as tight as the controls on launching an atomic bomb. As if someone is going to tail me to figure out where I play squash and then hack into my account and start maliciously booking loads of courts for me when I can't play. And there's loads of things like that, stupid websites that you use once to buy one thing or whatever. The danger is that you lazily use an important password that you already used for your bank or something and then if someone does somehow learn it then they could potentially hack your bank or whatever. It feels like having to invent more and more pointless passwords is in itself a security risk. I mean maybe that's just me being scatterbrained and lazy but presumably I'm not the only one.
 
Top