Exhibitions, Art.

luka

Well-known member
i think it's an interesting thing to think about. you'd think there would be a point past which it stops working but im not so sure. i remember being played a record from the ussr made on an x-ray
and it was really just the ghost of a song in amongst the haunted background noise and yet it was magical and thrilling. part of that was context of course, but at the same time, a voice comes through, it talks to you.

at the other end of the spectrum any increase in fidelity is psychedelic and almost overwhelming at the point at which it occurs but once it becomes the new norm that new level of detail no longer registers. im familiar with the effect as im always losing or breaking my glasses. so i go back and forth between low resolution and high resolution fairly frequently.
 

baboon2004

Darned cockwombles.
And too many people go to take photos of the pictures. I mean, this is almost worse than putting your phone up at a gig. Google exists?

Corpsey's point about lighting is a good one - with all that money, so many galleries flunk the basics.
 

Corpsey

bandz ahoy
i was really going off tate modern anyway but going on acid confirmed it. it was rubbish. vapid. tedtalk culture-bites.

Conceptual art is something to consider in relation to what we were talking about last night - because it's not really about material at all. The material is just a signpost for the concept (in much of that stuff).
 

luka

Well-known member
Conceptual art is something to consider in relation to what we were talking about last night - because it's not really about material at all. The material is just a signpost for the concept (in much of that stuff).

im going to do that post now. it will be very clever. it will inspire clever thoughts and insights from everyone on the board. a bonding experience in a shared creation of brilliance. gimmie one sec....
 

Corpsey

bandz ahoy
"What a red rag is to a bull, Turner's "Slave Ship" was to me, before I studied art. Mr. Ruskin is educated in art up to a point where that picture throws him into as mad an ecstasy of pleasure as it used to throw me into one of rage, last year, when I was ignorant. His cultivation enables him—and me, now—to see water in that glaring yellow mud, and natural effects in those lurid explosions of mixed smoke and flame, and crimson sunset glories; it reconciles him—and me, now—to the floating of iron cable-chains and other unfloatable things; it reconciles us to fishes swimming around on top of the mud—I mean the water. The most of the picture is a manifest impossibility—that is to say, a lie; and only rigid cultivation can enable a man to find truth in a lie. But it enabled Mr. Ruskin to do it, and it has enabled me to do it, and I am thankful for it. A Boston newspaper reporter went and took a look at the Slave Ship floundering about in that fierce conflagration of reds and yellows, and said it reminded him of a tortoise-shell cat having a fit in a platter of tomatoes. In my then uneducated state, that went home to my non-cultivation, and I thought here is a man with an unobstructed eye. Mr. Ruskin would have said: This person is an ass. That is what I would say, now." - Mark Twain

1023px-Slave-ship.jpg


I was staring at this last night and I find it really hard to place where the horizon is, what the point of view is, where the sunset begins and ends. I had never even noticed the black of the oncoming typhoon before.
 

Corpsey

bandz ahoy
And too many people go to take photos of the pictures. I mean, this is almost worse than putting your phone up at a gig. Google exists?

I take photos at galleries, as a sort of reminder of what I particularly liked or was interested in. I try to append notes to these photos in the moment - zooming in on a particular thing I've noticed, etc.

What interests me is people walking up to a painting, taking a photo and immediately leaving - what they're doing (presumably) is registering that they've seen it, that they've been there, like it's an achievement on a video game.

Actually this extends to people photographing the world. I suppose social media has particularly exacerbated this tendency. I've noticed it a lot when travelling to places like Lisbon and Sevilla, doing touristy stuff.

Our relationship to the visible has changed.
 

luka

Well-known member
take it to the dematerialisation thread corpsey. if you dont hand your homework in soon youre going on detention.
 

jenks

thread death
I went to The Clock in Tate Mod on Sunday. For those who don't already know it's a 24 hr film in which every shot is from a piece of film which references the exact time - so sitting in the cinema at 10:24 you will see characters at 10:24 in a piece of film. It sounds teeth achingly arch but the accumulative effect is somewhat mesmerising and ideas about time/ real life v film's gesturing at realism/ the codes and conventions and constant awareness of time and time passing/ the pleasure of recognising actors, films or locations/ the attempt to create meaning from disparate fragments/ the sheer mind boggling difficulty of putting it all together...

I'm guessing it will divide opinion here but I'll be going back (at a different time) to carry on watching - for me it does what conceptual art can do well which is to be immersive and for the idea to transcend mere one line cleverness.
 

Corpsey

bandz ahoy
i think it's an interesting thing to think about. you'd think there would be a point past which it stops working but im not so sure. i remember being played a record from the ussr made on an x-ray
and it was really just the ghost of a song in amongst the haunted background noise and yet it was magical and thrilling. part of that was context of course, but at the same time, a voice comes through, it talks to you.

I wanted to talk about this in connection with damaged statues and paintings that acquire a different beauty and resonance because of the damage and decay.

In Sevilla I saw a few examples of art that has become more beautiful (to my modern, post-gothic/romantic taste) because it's deteriorated. For example a Velasquez painting in which a praying man's hands have merged into censer smoke, heightening the sense of mystery and ineffability.

Also in some of the marbles in the BritMuseum the fact that the heads and hands have fallen off figures cuts them down to their essentials, so that you can really see how the body has been portrayed most effectively to convey emotion/action/energy.
 

Mr. Tea

Shub-Niggurath, Please
Also in some of the marbles in the BritMuseum the fact that the heads and hands have fallen off figures cuts them down to their essentials, so that you can really see how the body has been portrayed most effectively to convey emotion/action/energy.

What I find hard to get my head around is that ancient Greek and Roman statues were (at least typically, I think) originally painted. We're so used to seeing them in the cool natural grey of the marble that I can't help but think they'd look incredibly gaudy all coloured in.
 

Leo

Well-known member
Sarah Lucas retrospective just opened in NYC, actually liked it more than I thought I would. I always found her work to be a bit cliched from a distance but it actually holds up when seen together. Curious how people in the UK view the YBAs today...favorably, or just seen as Saatchi hype? Chris Ofili is great, and always like Richard Patterson.
 
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luka

Well-known member
today me and Jim went to the Leon Kossof exhibition. it's free. worth a look if your in the area.
he captures the grotty london light well, and the sense of your perception-portals being permanently gunked up
 
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