padraig (u.s.)

a monkey that will go ape
Padraig you know this one?
it's on the African section of my endless "things to check out" list but I'd never heard it. bit too jazzmatazz for me tbh. flutes are a tough sell.

there are like, a million insane African records disco/funk/boogie from the mid-70s thru late 80s tho

even more if you count the diaspora stuff through Martinique and the Caribbean - lotta expatriates putting out records in France

it's a huge mainstay of the reissue industrial complex (and its shadier cousin the uncredited edits complex) but there's still tons of obscure stuff

idk I feel like it's not the kinda thing that sparks conversation, would just be me posting a ton of YT vids
 
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padraig (u.s.)

a monkey that will go ape
I'm glad you enjoy some of these things btw, it's always good when someone does

zero point in knowing cool records if you can't turn some people on to them
 

entertainment

Well-known member
I can only speak about it in primitive terms. It's funky, it's technically impressive, it makes me smile. It's probably the fewest among us who are attuned to the nuance and minutiae of afro-funk or can wax ethnographic about the songs' embeddedness in cultural contexts.
 

padraig (u.s.)

a monkey that will go ape
wax ethnographically about the songs' embeddedness in cultural contexts
I definitely wouldn't claim to be able to do that in any serious capacity. maybe Nigeria or South Africa a bit but still, very rudimentary.

nuance and minutaie is a stretch too, I barely have any music theory or whatever background.

my only criteria for a record (barring like, racist lyrics or something) is whether I like it, I'm just not into that particular record.

it's just hearing a lot of records you can eventually pick out tropes and stuff

one of the things I like about 70s and 80s African music is how nationally or regionally distinctive it often is, underneath a general framework of whatever was the globally dominant sound at that moment. it's like 80s hardcore (punk) in that regard, when scenes in different countries or even cities often had highly unique sounds. one of the downsides of the Internet, the diminishing of regional sounds.

anyway, if you like it that's cool. I go through a ton of records I'm not into, that's how you find the killer tracks.
 

version

Who loves ya, baby?
I first heard this in a HUF vid. I think anyone who watches skate vids ends up stumbling across all sorts as a direct result.

 

Leo

Well-known member
zombi are pretty cool, they get written about in lots of metal mags. Steve Moore also have a lot of good film soundtrack (low-budget Carpenter-eque) and solo stuff that's a bit more experimental.
 

Leo

Well-known member
it was next-gen basic channel, sort of. no music by Moritz and mark, they ran the label and probably selected the tracks.
 

version

Who loves ya, baby?
I've a general idea of what it was about and who was involved, but I'm totally unfamiliar with the back cat.
 

Corpsey

call me big papa
Exquisite music for a summer's evening when you're sat by the window lamenting your matelessness.


Samples Donny Hathaway:

 
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