luka

Well-known member
Staff member
I generally like unwholesome flavours. Fermented flavours. Vile, mouldy cheeses. Barnyard flavours. Rotting flavours.
 

catalog

Well-known member
I think you are getting your mangoes from the wrong place. You need to get the boxed ones from the Indian and Pakistani shops. The ones in supermarkets are not the right ones. They are actually in season right now
 

catalog

Well-known member
When I eat a mango I like to suck the stone till its dry, then I bite the little hairs out, this allows me to split the stone, then from there I get the inner seed. It has this odd protective transparent layer, sort of like tracing paper. I like to peel that off. Then I peel off the darker brown husk off the inner seed. Then split that seed. Then it's over. You can't eat any of those bits.
 
Last edited:

catalog

Well-known member
Nectarines and peaches. I like to pick the threads from the stones with a pin. And crack the seeds gradually in my mouth, to get more threads. When I was a teenager, I ate so many nectarines in one day I had go go to hospital with stomach pains. Got given gaviscon. It was cos of the excess acid. 10 or so necrafines in one day. These days I'm more careful
 

Leo

Well-known member
maybe not #1 but underrated: kiwis. a fruit of contrasts, both sweet and tangy, smooth and gritty.
 

Leo

Well-known member
I grew up with apple and pear trees in the back yard, was nice to experience the freshest possible versions versus ones picked unripened and shipped across the country to supermarkets. we had so much that for fun, we'd run over the ones that fell off the trees with the lawn mower to see how far they would shoot out.

homemade fruit, one might call it.
 

luka

Well-known member
Staff member
I think you are getting your mangoes from the wrong place. You need to get the boxed ones from the Indian and Pakistani shops. The ones in supermarkets are not the right ones. They are actually in season right now
I don't eat mango in this country. I ate them a lot when I lived in Australia because they grow them there
 

version

Who loves ya, baby?
Laird Hamilton doesn't eat a lot of fruit because it's seasonal and he says you aren't meant to eat it all year round, plus the sugar.
 

version

Who loves ya, baby?
Are we taking the fruit in its entireity into account or just how it tastes? I like the taste of peach, I just can't abide the squishy mess, eating around the stone etc. The same with watermelon. It's a messy fruit.
 

luka

Well-known member
Staff member
i absolutely love watermelon. it's one of my favourite things in life. i rank it aloongside corn on the cob slathered in meting butter and studded with salt and pepper.
 

luka

Well-known member
Staff member
if you have it in a salad with feta and mint and olive like the ones that were in every cafe in London 2 or 3 years ago.eg
 

Leo

Well-known member
seedless watermelons, the frankenfruit

Watermelon breeders discovered that crossing a diploid plant (bearing the standard two sets of chromosomes) with a tetraploid plant (having four sets of chromosomes) results in a fruit that produces a triploid seed. (Yes, it has three sets of chromosomes.) This triploid seed is the seed that produces seedless watermelons.

A seedless watermelon is a sterile hybrid which is created by crossing male pollen for a watermelon, containing 22 chromosomes per cell, with a female watermelon flower with 44 chromosomes per cell. When this seeded fruit matures, the small, white seed coats inside contain 33 chromosomes, rendering it sterile and incapable of producing seeds. This is similar to the mule, produced by crossing a horse with a donkey – simple cross-breeding. And to be clear on the subject, this is not genetic modification. Cross-breeding is two parents and their offspring.
 
Top