Jordan Peterson thinks it makes sense to compare humans with lobsters

suspended

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"If all we remember [about the Holocaust] is that the Nazis killed the Jews, we are already on the road to making a similar mistake to that which led to the Holocaust to begin with, which is to identify characteristics which lead to actions of that sort as characteristics of groups"
 

suspended

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People forget—it is uncontroversial, i.e it has been widely testified to by tenured UToronto psychology professors—that Peterson was the most beloved professor they'd ever seen. That huge swathes of his classes—which were evenly split between men and women, lecturing on topics that had nothing to do with the current "address to men" incel shtick he's on—would break out in tears during his lectures, and write that JBP had changed the entire direction of their lives. I've heard interviews with members of that department who said it was "common knowledge" that Peterson was operating on a "different level" as an instructor—that his end-of-term evaluations were so consistently, overwhelmingly, unanimously glowing that it became a regular topic of gossip and fascination among other departmental instructors.

So, whatever embarrassments he's committed and been a part of in his 70s—and come on now, basically everyone is geriatric and confused by that age—he's an incredibly formidable figure who cannot be easily dismissed.
 
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suspended

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I've personally invested, and am still investing, a lot of time into watching his taped lectures from these periods, and they are absolutely top-tier. There's a tremendous amount to be learned, not just from the content/ideas he's pushing, but about how he presents them, how he leads an audience through a story, how he speaks and pauses and emphasizes for effect.
 

chava

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But not really from the _left_ has there? Maybe I did read something, I forgot about it now.
 

chava

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I've personally invested, and am still investing, a lot of time into watching his taped lectures from these periods, and they are absolutely top-tier. There's a tremendous amount to be learned, not just from the content/ideas he's pushing, but about how he presents them, how he leads an audience through a story, how he speaks and pauses and emphasizes for effect.

I've only seen his first Harvard lecture (the one you linked). His UoTs lectures before he got infamous are excellent as well. I mean even if you disagree about everything he is saying at least you can acknowledge his talent as a teacher.

He is a complicated fellow that's for sure. In one of the docs he tells how as a teen he envisioned his statesman-like funeral (he mentioned Robert Kennedy). So I am pretty sure a great deal of his warnings of totalitarianism, narcissism even schizophrenia are directed at himself. As any proper psychologist of course should do.
 

mixed_biscuits

_________________________
People forget—it is uncontroversial, i.e it has been widely testified to by tenured UToronto psychology professors—that Peterson was the most beloved professor they'd ever seen. That huge swathes of his classes—which were evenly split between men and women, lecturing on topics that had nothing to do with the current "address to men" incel shtick he's on—would break out in tears during his lectures, and write that JBP had changed the entire direction of their lives. I've heard interviews with members of that department who said it was "common knowledge" that Peterson was operating on a "different level" as an instructor—that his end-of-term evaluations were so consistently, overwhelmingly, unanimously glowing that it became a regular topic of gossip and fascination among other departmental instructors.

So, whatever embarrassments he's committed and been a part of in his 70s—and come on now, basically everyone is geriatric and confused by that age—he's an incredibly formidable thinker who cannot be easily dismissed.
His critics are scared of opening themselves up to this possibility: he's a basilisk
 
In a couple of early-2000s summers we bought into the little fishing adventures off the Welsh coast. Mostly Caernarfon Bay, but you can head down to Cardigan Bay too if you fancy the drive to Aberaeron or Borth. A long slog for me but it was nice there too

Caernarfon Bay on a spring tide with a clear sky can be a fruitful day, though you need a good large diameter spool to take advantage of the big Skates and Turbots. You can get Gurnards out there too, the ugly bastards.

If you want to make more of a day of it- it's not an easy drive unless you're on the north-west- then the big hotel in Nefyn is meant to be decent. If you're unfamiliar with the Welsh coast, I think the sand banks and reefs could well catch you off-guard. Maybe worth more than a day

If you're local you can get yourself a permit for lobster, crawfish, whelks etc, but i think its harder to get into that as an outsider. You might be able to jump on someone else's permit if you're there for a while, do your catch and return form. Really though it's just putting the cages out, hoping for the best.

Fishing has more sense of reward i think but there is something about the freedom of being out there in the water really. Its a good peninsula
 
These areas have their own myths, of course. If you head inland from Cardigan Bay you can find yourself at a hamlet like Tal-y-llyn.

Nonsense of course but legend has it that these lakes are bottomless and to camp out on the surrounding hills at night will bring on a curse. You could wake having lost your senses, or perhaps not wake at all

Just stay at the Pen-y-Bont instead eh
 
I read some of the first Peterson book.

"The myth, like the dream, may be regarded as the birthplace of conscious abstract knowledge, as the matrix from which formed ideas spring."

The curse of following the scholar is that you don't develop your own mythology. I'd rather catch a skate on the sea than a lobster in a cage
 

mixed_biscuits

_________________________
I read some of the first Peterson book.

"The myth, like the dream, may be regarded as the birthplace of conscious abstract knowledge, as the matrix from which formed ideas spring."

The curse of following the scholar is that you don't develop your own mythology. I'd rather catch a skate on the sea than a lobster in a cage
Right, like you're gonna develop a mythology worth owt on your tod
 

version

Well-known member
I just read Henry Miller going off on myth.

"By retracing the paths to the earlier heroic life . . . you defeat the very element and
quality of the heroic, for the hero never looks backward, nor does he
ever doubt his powers. Hamlet was undoubtedly a hero to himself, and
for every Hamlet born the only true course to pursue is the very course
which Shakespeare describes. But the question, it seems to me, is this:
are we born Hamlets? Were you born Hamlet? Or did you not rather
create the type in yourself? Whether this be so or not, what seems
infinitely more important is — why revert to myth ? . . . This ideational
rubbish out of which our world has erected its cultural edifice is now, by
a critical irony, being given its poetic immolation, its mythos, through a
kind of writing which, because it is of the disease and therefore beyond,
clears the ground for fresh superstructures. (In my own mind the thought
of 'fresh superstructures' is abhorrent, but this is merely the awareness of
a process and not the process itself.) Actually, in process, I believe with
each line I write that I am scouring the womb, giving it the curette, as it
were. Behind this process lies the idea not of 'edifice' and 'superstructure,'
which is culture and hence false, but of continuous birth, renewal, life,
life, ... In the myth there is no life for us. Only the myth lives in the
myth . . . . This ability to produce the myth is born out of awareness, out
of ever-increasing consciousness. That is why, speaking of the
schizophrenic nature of our age, I said — 'until the process is completed
the belly of the world shall be the Third Eye.' Now, Brother Ambrose,
just what did I mean by that? What could I mean except that from this
intellectual world in which we are swimming there must body forth a new world;
but this new world can only be bodied forth in so far as it is conceived.
And to conceive there must first be desire, . . .
Desire is instinctual and holy: it is only through desire that we bring about the
immaculate conception."
 

catalog

Well-known member
He's become a victim of the algorithm I suppose. He had some ideas, a few kernals of truth, as we all do, but he'd shined em up good and proper. He went up some steep paths with it.

And then he went viral and got properly chewed and spat out.
 
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