luka

Well-known member
Staff member
it's a very strange name. foreign sounding. brings to mind olives of course, which are foreign. and oliphants. also foreign.
 

luka

Well-known member
Staff member
Oliver is originally derived from the Latin word olivarius meaning olive tree planter. It also has Old French and Medieval origins. The name was originally introduced by the Normans to England. The name was popularized again in the 19th century by Dickens' Oliver Twist. Syllables: 3.
 

luka

Well-known member
Staff member
Contrary to popular belief, the Oliver has nothing to do with the olive tree. The name Oliver is derived from the old Norse name Áleifr, meaning "ancestor's descendant." The most common nickname for Oliver is Ollie. Other nicknames include Ol and Oly.
 

luka

Well-known member
Staff member
Brought to England by the Normans, the name Oliver has origins in the French name Olivier and dates back to the time of Charlemagne. Oliver has peaceful associations, thought to be derived from the Latin olivarius meaning “olive tree” but sometimes attributed to Olaf, or the Old Norse name Oleifr.
 

luka

Well-known member
Staff member
Oliver is a traditionally masculine name that's long been popular — likely because it works (and has a wide variety of meanings) in many languages. In English and French the name usually derives from the olive tree, which has been said to symbolize peace (you've likely heard of "extending an olive branch" as a pacifist gesture). In Norse, Oliver means "affectionate," and in German it refers to an "elf army" (?!). Magical meanings abound!
 

luka

Well-known member
Staff member
Oliver is a masculine given name of Old French and Medieval British origin; Oliver is one of Charlemagne's retainers in the eleventh-century Song of Roland.

The name was generally associated with the Latin term/name olivarius "olive tree planter",[1][2] but may have been connected with the Germanic names *wulfa- "wolf" and *χarja- "army",[3] or the Old Norse Óleifr (Ólaf); or a genuinely West Germanic name, perhaps from ala- "all" and wēra "true"(possibly cognate with Álvaro) the Anglo-Saxon Alfhere[4] and the Greek name Eleutherios.

Modern variants include French Olivier, Hungarian Olivér, Irish Oilibhéar or Oilibhéir, Scottish Gaelic Oilvreis, Portuguese Olívio,[5] Italian Oliviero, Spanish Óliver.
 

Mr. Tea

Shub-Niggurath, Please
Staff member
it's a very strange name. foreign sounding. brings to mind olives of course, which are foreign. and oliphants. also foreign.
I thought it was to do with olives when I was little, but I think it's actually derived from Olaf, which is quite cool.

Although that's a bit barbarian-sounding for the quintessentially civilized craner.
 

luka

Well-known member
Staff member
 

IdleRich

IdleRich
I thought it was to do with olives when I was little, but I think it's actually derived from Olaf, which is quite cool.

Although that's a bit barbarian-sounding for the quintessentially civilized craner.
Delivered with almost believable disinterest.
 

luka

Well-known member
Staff member
Perhaps things will change once I have learned to become a psychedelic poet after tomorrow night's course.
a mental slant can reverse the malaise. It's worth the endeavor. Everywhere is rich, otherwise poetry is a pox.
 
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