blissblogger

Well-known member
kamler's "chronopolis" is INCREDIBLE!! very very happy with it, makes me think of an approach to film similar to patrick bokanowski's "l'ange" but with more potential. see here:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ynjAl6V81X0

wow i've never come across this dude

before Creel Pone, the people behind it (ie Keith Fullerton Whitman) did a label based around stripping the never-released-separately musique concrete / electronic soundtracks off of animations and short experimental films, and releasing them as 3-inch CDs.

New England Electric Music Company was the label - https://www.discogs.com/label/13172-New-England-Electric-Music-Company

named in homage to Thaddeus Cahill and his Telharmonium

a not-for-profit fan enterprise - apparently they started out just secretly dropping them into the racks at a record store in Boston called Twisted Village
 

other_life

bioconfused
^ perfect synthesis of "the hypnagogic illusion" and "off the deep end". would totally put this in a mix. wish i could figure how to do stuff like this live besides putting sampler through randomised arp in ableton but then u have to fiddle w the individual samples to get it right
 

DLaurent

Well-known member
It's randomised arp on two channels with Melda MMorph on both channels, so it carries on playing 'randomly' and morphing at the same time. Same effects chain you can use on pretty much anything. I've 'lost' my imac though.

I had one done with an acapella of 'first time ever i saw your face' that was great. It's teh first time it's been done. :teeth:
 
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I downloaded, cheekily, vast amounts of the creel pone stuff, more or less at random a couple of years ago, enough that I still haven't digested it. I've found it really really good to take drugs to.

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=kAEHELfXdfc

Two great tastes that go great together. With Creel Pone stuff, it's cannabis and good literature, maybe Burroughs or Iain Sinclair, with retro-future sound saturating the environment, and the demons recede for the evening.

Kind of in the same vein, where electronic music could still explore the transfinities of electro-acoustic space without the overcoding of "genre" and "scenes" (groupthink kills experimentation , everyone walks in a straight line), we have Tom Dissevelt and Kid Baltan, who were ironically supported by the Phillips multinational corporation: We need more NatLabs. So what is this, corporate electro-acoustic? I don't know:


been trying to figure out also why (as per quote from bob ostertag) the fifties, sixties, seventies etc stuff sounds so strange and demented and like opening up new universes c.f. more recent decades of work in this vein doesn't sound as liberated or expansive

i think it's something to do with the switch to digital - bit like how CGI can be amazingly detailed and real-seeming but doesn't have the magic of analogue forms of special effects and animation that involve models, stop-motion, drawn cels, etc etc

it's not just that restriction is the mother of invention (it's not like people have got less inventive) it's more.... ontological maybe is the word or something like that. there is something fundamentally disenchanted about digital means.

I think you're right, but there's more to it. You get more freedom in a laboratory setting, be it academic or corporate, and of course when you don't have to worry about selling records, or working within categories or parameters, and you don't have to feel the pressure of audience expectations, you can just let loose. So you eliminate genre expectations, music scene expectations, audience expectations, free yourself from that weight and resistance, and you're free to explore as an artist. That's when the suppressed stuff, sounds we're not meant to hear, surface.

I wonder how the general Dissensus poster feels about Pitchfork. Personally, if I could get away with it, I'd murder every bastard associated with that soul-killing enterprise.
 
Is this the deep end of electroacoustics? It feels (to me) like simulated murder theatre, a Francis Bacon painting, a live field recording of a concentration camp or slaughterhouse all compressed into... a piece of music? Or maybe the reverberations of a very ancient, very sick, very evil act:


Of all the time travelling electronic musicians, Stock has to be the biggest arsehole. I mean arsehole in a good way, ofc.

(If you got that reference: This is over. We're done with you.)

Well back to listening to the audiobook of Fifty Shades of Grey. It's fun. You can detourn the dialogue, reimagine or insert your own scenes, throw in some goblins or ghouls when EL James' endless descriptions of furniture, doors, and walls start to make you yawn. But the casting agent nailed it with Dakota Johnson. There can be no other Anastasia Steele. I haven't seen any of the movies so don't "spoil" it for me.
 

treelethargy

many doors yes?
Is this the deep end of electroacoustics? It feels (to me) like simulated murder theatre, a Francis Bacon painting, a live field recording of a concentration camp or slaughterhouse all compressed into... a piece of music? Or maybe the reverberations of a very ancient, very sick, very evil act:


Of all the time travelling electronic musicians, Stock has to be the biggest arsehole. I mean arsehole in a good way, ofc.

(If you got that reference: This is over. We're done with you.)

Well back to listening to the audiobook of Fifty Shades of Grey. It's fun. You can detourn the dialogue, reimagine or insert your own scenes, throw in some goblins or ghouls when EL James' endless descriptions of furniture, doors, and walls start to make you yawn. But the casting agent nailed it with Dakota Johnson. There can be no other Anastasia Steele. I haven't seen any of the movies so don't "spoil" it for me.

immensely abrasive for sure. probably not. violent musique concrete isn't what i'm looking for here, but i like the physicality of it !!
 

woops

is not like other people
this was a great thread and i love most of this music already but now plan to listen to the ones i don't know
 
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