Dub

yyaldrin

in je ogen waait de wind
Treasure Dub Vols 1 & 2

Released shortly after Duke Reid's death in 1975, these two LP's were mixed by Treasure Isle Engineer Errol Brown and later pirated by Coxsone Dodd. I'd be the first to admit that these are not spectacular dubs, but they are an exceptional compilation of the wellspring of reggae - the rocksteady riddims that sustained the genre for at least 20 years after their original release.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qkcIEpU2yS0
https://youtu.be/sTtPGvpQGuc

scanning duke reid's discog page and this is great and fits in nicely with that old thread about coincidences in music, or how things come to be, how unusual paths or lucky encounters lead to possibilities. like winning the lottery and getting into music to attract customers to your recently opened liquor store.

Arthur ‘Duke’ Reid (b.1915, Jamaica) had spent ten years as a Kingston policeman when he and his wife Lucille decided to buy The Treasure Isle Liquor Store in Kingston, Jamaica, after winning a substantial Jamaican National lottery. Wanting music to attract customers, the Duke arranged through a sponsorship deal to host his own radio show ‘Treasure Isle Time’. The people would listen to the latest American R&B tunes on 78rpm, interspersed with liquor deals going down at his store. This in time would lead to the starting of his own Sound System, where he could take his liquor to the dances via his Trojan truck. He used a large van to transport this equipment around Jamaica to dance halls and open air events. Due to the nature of the van it became known as the Trojan. With shouts of ‘Here comes the Trojan’, Duke Reid’s now named Trojan Sound System was born. It proved such a success that he was crowned King of Sound and Blues three years in a row 1956, 1957 and 1958. 1958 also saw the store which was out growing itself, move to its legendary premises, 33 Bond Street, as Treasure Isle Recording Studio
 

DannyL

Wild Horses
My dub knowledge is pretty weak, considering how much JA music I listen to. I always tend to go the rocksteady route instead. Most of my faves are vocal pieces followed by the dubs.

That said:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I3mTbw1p-v8

Most beautiful dub of all time?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jliZ6PpUcIY

Trying to find a version I used to have on a Ariwa white label but I can't so this will have to do

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PrmYhWsE1d8

I used to have a Shaka LP that had a bunch of Congos dubs that was probably by favourite dub LP ever - again, can't find it so here's Lee Perry. Dub on the second half here.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kluXriHlYC0

I think it's interesting to contrast those who keep the rhythm clean with those who had a bunch of effects. Mikey Dread springs to mind. Dub at the end again.
 

droid

Well-known member
Cornell Campbell ‎– The Gorgon Dubwise

Another compilation, and only 10 years old. This collects mostly mid-70's Bunny Lee dubs. Apart from Campbell's ridiculously sweet voice, what makes this essential is a snapshot of the aggrovators at their peak and the heavy use of the propulsive 'flying cymbal' or 'flyers' closed/open hi-hat pattern, inspired by the Philly soul sound and popularised by drummer Carlton "Santa" Davis around 1974. Tubby exploited this sound to it fullest on Dub From the Roots and The Roots of Dub before it was supplanted a couple of years later by the Rockers template.

https://youtu.be/Ocfi9BzqeHo

Check that wonderfully whimsical clicky percussion on the re-version of Slim Smith's 'never let you go' (track 2).
 
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DannyL

Wild Horses
Yes to Cornell Campbbell! It's that falsetto in contrast to the bottom end which is so devastating.
 

droid

Well-known member
Massive Attack vs Mad Professor: NO PROTECTION

Speaking of crazy UK dub - this record was another one that got me hooked. On the face of it there's plenty of reasons to shy away, its massive attack and full of 'crazy' edits, but it has a beautiful summer blissed out vibe and fantastic attention to detail. Think it was the first dub record I bought on vinyl. Id go so far as to say it's the best thing mad professor ever did.


https://youtu.be/lwb7ucFnbhM

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NFWnudOKjZA

https://youtu.be/IRdsWKSwjcU
 

jorge

Well-known member
some great selections here, that massive attack one was one of the first dub albums i bought too, took me a while to get into it, possibly due to the tiny speakers i was using at the time

Prince Far I - Cry tuff vol 1 is the best dub album ive heard, very psychedelic, love that dripping sound that keeps popping up

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qzPXlyyucq8&t=945s

some more adrian sherwood productions, asian rebel is one of the best i think, quite unique to my ears, mad bassline

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fu4H26OMzN4

love the way the hihats rip through the mix on this one

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uMYC8Twm5Oc
 

Leo

Well-known member
Yeah, I mean it's a cliche but you are only getting about 10% out of dub if you aren't hearing it on a big system.

I was going to post a jah Shaka video for "the king and I dub" (but then a bunch of his tracks got posted so I bailed on the idea) and reminisce about how I was once in long-closed NYC reggae record store jammyland and the guy played it on their pretty massive sound system, the snare drum sound felt like I was getting punched in the chest. wicked.
 

luka

Well-known member
Dub exploded my listening. I don't know if it was the same for you. I assume yeah or I would explain right
 

luka

Well-known member
Well it was boring till I heard it stoned. I think this is the reason it is a blind spot for you incidentally.
 

droid

Well-known member
The ultimate expression of the studio as instrument, and also the mechanistic reduction of musicians to grist in the producers mill.
 
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