luka

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Or trapped inside a tanker rapping or objects fling about inside a tanker very large vessel inside of
 

luka

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Then there's a breakthrough into another dimension, time and space distorted in ways as you mention are exactly as you find in dub
 

luka

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It gets very intestinal and internal, very tubular passages, very moving through these corridors
 

luka

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So much of it is voice transfigured, the internal architectures of the body, all that mucoid ooze and muscular propulsion of air
 

thirdform

Well-known member
when you think of this music, what's the first, archetypal work that comes to mind? if there is one. for me it's gesang der junglinge

(this is a question for anyone ITT too)
ilhan mimaroglu - wings of the delirious demon. nothing but clarinet treatments so not as maximal as parmegiani who was basically a plunder all kinds of sounds bod, - ditto bayle but more the transformation type of guy. the clarinet is made to do all sorts of weird and wacky things which are basically, well, techno/euro rave 22-23 years before. it's basically the obliteration of the worker and the collective proletarian in audio form. it's less about sound as colour but sound as agitprop, but not in the didactic sense. there are also very uncanny hissing and creaking dissociations that are redolent of schizophrenia. less the devilish crow sounds that you get in Parmegiani telling you to fear but the ineluctable logic of having already been sucked in. there's also a very juttering aspect to it. like a meat grinder. it's basically industrial realism as opposed to edgelord industrial.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IdsYDblSzLo
 

luka

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Partly I think it might be a question of what to do next. We don't need to do this, but what do we need to do?

Partly what this is, is collage and cubism, spatial and time distortions, transformations of one thing into another by stretching or compressing the grid in the way demonstrated by Kenner in the Pound Era.image.jpg
 

luka

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Or I think of the computer games where before play begins you model your character along certain parameters, the brow more or less prominent, with this or that angle, on a sliding scale....
Eyes angled, eyes sized, eye colour, all along these sliding scales by which this becomes that by degrees
 

mvuent

Void Dweller
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gV8281xNNKc

very moving through these corridors
I think as much as this one is "about" anything, it's about playing with our perception of space. Not just in the literal sense of panning / the stereo field (is that "boring music nerd stuff"? ;)) but in terms of our mental construction of our surroundings through sound. In other words, we don't only notice if a sound is close or far, or to the left or right--but further infer from creaking sounds that we're "in" a small room, etc. And with such a developed sense of space, it becomes possible to move from one corridor to the next in very strange, poetic ways. As a space is established, you're lulled into thinking that what you're hearing (however bizarre it might be) conforms to the normal behavior of sound--and then the rug gets pulled out from under you. You're not in everyday life, but an exceptionally vivid dream.
 
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mvuent

Void Dweller
Which is interesting because his mentor Pierre Schaeffer was very much a Classical melody and harmony guy who didn't want the sounds he used to be associated with their inferred source. It seems to me like by this point in his life Parmegiani had completely parted ways with that approach, if he ever bought it in the first place.
 

mvuent

Void Dweller
Partly I think it might be a question of what to do next. We don't need to do this, but what do we need to do?

Partly what this is, is collage and cubism, spatial and time distortions, transformations of one thing into another by stretching or compressing the grid in the way demonstrated by Kenner in the Pound Era.
this might be related to Stockhausen's idea of "unified time structuring"

another aspect that's worth looking into, taken from your 20 questions, is motion. or more broadly, electroacoustic as audio animation.

one thing that has struck me that is analogous with the musique concrete tape-snip stuff is animation as technique - like an arrangement of heterogenous audio objects brought into the same space and given eerie life
 

mvuent

Void Dweller
Or I think of the computer games where before play begins you model your character along certain parameters, the brow more or less prominent, with this or that angle, on a sliding scale....
Eyes angled, eyes sized, eye colour, all along these sliding scales by which this becomes that by degrees
I think a lot of technique goes into getting the sounds to bend and distort perpetually. it's as if you're playing a video game where the characters' features are constantly changing as you go rather than set in a fixed state beforehand. the goal is to eventually use all the options provided by the sliding scale rather than sticking with one combination.
 
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luka

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Staff member
I think a lot of technique goes into getting the sounds to bend and distort perpetually. it's as if you're playing a video game where the characters' features are constantly changing as you go rather than set in a fixed state beforehand. the goal is to eventually use all the options provided by the sliding scale rather than sticking with one combination.
Yeah I agree you hear the morphing in progress. It's cool. I like it.
 

mvuent

Void Dweller
yeah. so do I.

How can we do something interesting with this thread? There must be a way.
whenever you, thirdform, blissblogger, anyone else who's engaged jump in, it does become interesting. it's just a matter of whether or not people feel like participating.
 
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mvuent

Void Dweller
nothing but clarinet treatments so not as maximal as parmegiani who was basically a plunder all kinds of sounds bod, - ditto bayle but more the transformation type of guy.
where a work is on the scale of "eclectic plundering" <---> "working with basic / limited materials" is a good orienting question imo.
 
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mvuent

Void Dweller

version

Who loves ya, baby?
I've brought this up before but listening to De Natura Sonorum on vinyl for the first time was a revelation. There's a creature called a Mantis shrimp which is capable of seeing vastly more colours than we're even aware of and that's what it felt like, like having a veil or filter lifted and a flood of new colours coming in.

The eyes of the mantis shrimp are mounted on mobile stalks and can move independently of each other. They are thought to have the most complex eyes in the animal kingdom and have the most complex visual system ever discovered.[19][20][21] Compared to the three types of photoreceptor cells that humans possess in their eyes, the eyes of a mantis shrimp have between 12 and 16 types of photoreceptors cells. Furthermore, some of these shrimp can tune the sensitivity of their long-wavelength colour vision to adapt to their environment.[22] This phenomenon, called "spectral tuning", is species-specific.

Each compound eye is made up of up tens of thousands of ommatidia, clusters of photoreceptor cells.[20] Each eye consists of two flattened hemispheres separated by parallel rows of specialised ommatidia, collectively called the midband. The number of omatidial rows in the midband ranges from two to six.[19][20] This divides the eye into three regions. This configuration enables mantis shrimp to see objects with three parts of the same eye. In other words, each eye possesses trinocular vision and therefore depth perception. The upper and lower hemispheres are used primarily for recognition of form and motion, like the eyes of many other crustaceans.[19]

Mantis shrimp can perceive wavelengths of light ranging from deep ultraviolet (UVB) to far-red (300 to 720 nm) and polarized light.[20][24] In mantis shrimp in the superfamilies Gonodactyloidea, Lysiosquilloidea, and Hemisquilloidea, the midband is made up of six omatodial rows. Rows 1 to 4 process colours, while rows 5 and 6 detect circularly or linearly polarized light. Twelve types of photoreceptor cells are in rows 1 to 4, four of which detect ultraviolet light.[19][20][24][25]
I've also found that this stuff feels like listening to what sits between or within the elements of dance music, like sticking the lead from a house tune under a microscope and finding an entire world of sound in the broader strokes of the synth; zooming in on the bacteria on your skin and seeing it all bouncing around and vibrating.
 
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