Corpsey

call me big papa
His younger brother raped and killed a young girl and got caught and banged up. Chances are if he hadn't been caught he'd have been a serial killer.

Kuklinski had three siblings. His older brother Florian (1933–1941) died at the age of eight from injuries inflicted by his father during a violent beating.[11] The family lied to the police, saying that Florian had fallen down a flight of steps.[11] Stanley abandoned the family shortly after he murdered his first son. Kuklinski, who was the second son, had a younger sister, Roberta (1942–2010), and a younger brother, Joseph (1944–2003), who in 1970 was convicted of raping a 12-year-old girl and murdering her by throwing her off the top of a five-story building (along with her pet dog).[12][13] When asked about his brother's crimes, Kuklinski replied: "We come from the same father."[9]
 

Corpsey

call me big papa
It is a strange and grisly phenomenon (the celebrification thing I mean) - Ted Bundy is one of the most startling examples of that because he looked like he could have been a celebrity of some sort anyway.

The ones who become cult figures have a certain sort of televisual look or charisma to them - Manson, e.g.

And then there's others who become infamous because their crimes are so extreme e.g. Dahmer.

Honestly I have been way too into reading about these guys over the years and I try not to anymore because it can really scar you. The killers are fascinating somehow, just so outside of the norm of human behaviour, but the suffering of their victims is really impossible to process.
 

Mr. Tea

Shub-Niggurath, Please
Staff member
It is a strange and grisly phenomenon (the celebrification thing I mean) - Ted Bundy is one of the most startling examples of that because he looked like he could have been a celebrity of some sort anyway.

The ones who become cult figures have a certain sort of televisual look or charisma to them - Manson, e.g.

And then there's others who become infamous because their crimes are so extreme e.g. Dahmer.

Honestly I have been way too into reading about these guys over the years and I try not to anymore because it can really scar you. The killers are fascinating somehow, just so outside of the norm of human behaviour, but the suffering of their victims is really impossible to process.

I can imagine something along the lines of the Daily Mash:

"Maverick industrial-noise group honestly not all that bothered about serial killers."
 

beiser

Well-known member
learned this week that no fewer than two of my friends in school lived in apartments that the Boston Strangler killed people in. one of them was really hype about the place too, it was located above a good schwarma restaurant.
 

WashYourHands

Well-known member
@Linebaugh My Mum worked in palliative care. Mind-bending environments. She said it could attract very sinister people. Clean background checks. One used to put the fire alarm on at night in a residential dementia unit repeatedly and that’s the mild end of the spectrum.
 

beiser

Well-known member
@Linebaugh My Mum worked in palliative care. Mind-bending environments. She said it could attract very sinister people. Clean background checks. One used to put the fire alarm on at night in a residential dementia unit repeatedly and that’s the mild end of the spectrum.

That's sorta the trope nobody likes to touch because it's too horrifying, right? If you want to be a successful spree killer, just take a job as a nurse and then occasionally withhold necessary care and watch people spiral. Would anybody notice?
 

WashYourHands

Well-known member
Look at what happened here with elderly care homes and Covid. Look at how a pandemic changed hospital triage tiers for emergency admissions.

At any other time is a cliche, but, freed up equity and assets for people. You can’t make that joke yet because it’s true and we still clapped for the NHS while criminally underfunding it.

I can’t be the only one who has walked around certain places and looked up to see a care-home sign, tucked away, out of sight. It’s an entire industry. Where’s Gran? She’s in the cupboard. 1.5k a month. Only the best.
 

beiser

Well-known member
Look at what happened here with elderly care homes and Covid. Look at how a pandemic changed hospital triage tiers for emergency admissions.

At any other time is a cliche, but, freed up equity and assets for people. You can’t make that joke yet because it’s true and we still clapped for the NHS while criminally underfunding it.

I can’t be the only one who has walked around certain places and looked up to see a care-home sign, tucked away, out of sight. It’s an entire industry. Where’s Gran? She’s in the cupboard. 1.5k a month. Only the best.
Genuinely, I wonder if this was a motivating factor for governor cuomo in refusing to allow care homes to refuse admission to covid-positive people. You're the governor of a state that's facing a massive pension crisis, you have a virus that disproportionately kills pensioners, what do you do?
 

martin

----
I used to read a bit about serial killers. I spent ages trying to imagine what if I'd do if I was the victim - would I have done anything differently? Been smart enough to avoid it, or just blindly walked into a trap? Been able to fight them off? It's depressing how your fate can hinge on such banalities as working an extra half-hour or taking a different route home.

Not really a Peter Sotos fan but I loved that afterword he did in Ian Brady's rambling, pretentious autobiog where he ripped him apart and called him a pathetic nonce. Upset Brady so much he tried to sue (spoiler: he failed).
 
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