version

Who loves ya, baby?
I can probably count on one hand the number of times I've woken up "refreshed" in the last ten years or so. I seem doomed to over or under sleep.
 

john eden

male pale and stale
Eight hours weekdays, more at the weekend. 11pm-7am.

Alarm clock, no internet devices in the bedroom. No tea or coffee after about 4pm.

Generally don’t drink Sunday to Wednesday. Don’t smoke weed or anything.

Sometimes I feel like shit when I wake up but that’s just life.

Sometimes I am stressed out and have trouble sleeping. Sometimes I get up and listen to the birds.

I’ve learnt that generally I feel better after a few hours being awake and doing stuff.

That’s just boring old me though. :x:
 

luka

Well-known member
Staff member
I need 9-10 hours. I usually get it unless I'm drinking which plays havoc with my sleep.
 

version

Who loves ya, baby?
Some nights I just don't go to sleep then spend the next day feeling like a ghost. Tiredness is a terrible feeling.
 

john eden

male pale and stale
I start hallucinating bugs and other animals if I stay up all night. Like, without drugs or anything.

Rats eventually die if you deprive them of sleep perpetually.
 

yyaldrin

in je ogen waait de wind
i feel good sleeping 9 to 10 hours as well. that means i go to bed quite early during weekdays and sometimes makes me feel guilty, cos even old people go to bed later i have the feeling? i lost my ability to sleep good since some weeks/months due to stress. hope to be the old me soon. i love to sleep in the park when it's really warm, preferably under a tree, have the swinging branches and dancing leafs create intervals of sunlight and shadow. somehow makes me dream in a good way.

do dreams affect your personality and mood? if yes, do they still when you can't remember them?
 
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Who loves ya, baby?
I sometimes have such vivid dreams that it takes a couple of hours to shake them off and realise that whatever happened didn't happen for real. It can sour a day waking up like that.
 

yyaldrin

in je ogen waait de wind
I sometimes have such vivid dreams that it takes a couple of hours to shake them off and realise that whatever happened didn't happen for real. It can sour a day waking up like that.
i have this irrational fear that i have nightmares every night without knowing and that they are slowly changing my personality :confused:
 

Leo

Well-known member
usually 11:30 pm-7:00 am, find I'm now unable to sleep later on weekend...maybe 7:45-8:00 am at the latest.

I often snore, which disrupts deep sleep, so not always refreshed even with 7 or 8 hours. there also seems to be a direct correlation: the more red wine, the more I snore. the wife keeps bugging me to get tested for sleep apnea.

a 20-minute nap on a lazy winter Sunday afternoon can be a wonderful thing. longer than that can make it difficult to sleep at night.

eden is right about no iPhones/ipads in bed, the light from the screen wakes you up (and the horrible world news you read KEEPS you up at night).
 

Leo

Well-known member
used to occasional have a project that required me to do something from 2:00 am-6:00 am. would try to get an hour or so sleep after dinner but was never deep sleep. you feel weird pulling the all-nighter, in a strange limbo when heading home at 6:15 am...the sun just coming up, throwing an odd light on buildings, encounter a new early-birds walking their dogs or heading to work. you're tired but not necessarily sleepy, since your body clock is starting you up for the day again. easy to space out on things like crossing the street, almost got hit by a car once as I wandered in a bit of a daze.
 

baboon2004

Darned cockwombles.
Eight hours is my ideal, usually get less. One change with ageing is that my sleep has been less reliable - I used to count myself as someone without sleep issues, but no more. Re waking up and (not) feeling refreshed, even after long sleep, has anyone noticed truth in the sleep cycles idea (roughly 90 mins, wake up in the middleand feel awful)? Only explanation I have for the randomness of feeling good in the mornings.

Blue light and information overload is evil. I always feel better if I put down the screens at, say, 8pm, but rarely happens

Siestas can be wonderful. Britain, US etc are barbaric in enforced work hours
 

luka

Well-known member
Staff member
Are you a drinker baboon? My research tells me that is by far and away the number one disruptor of sleep. You don't need much. Even one or two drinks can do it.
 

baboon2004

Darned cockwombles.
Way less than I used to, so answer is really no these days. I find the downsides too aggravating, and yep, one of them is certainly poor sleep
 

martin

----
5-6 hours on week nights. Always been a night owl, would probably stay up til 4-5am most week nights if I didn't have to work. But rarely crash out before 1am as it is. Should I be worried? I don't feel that bad for it, but maybe all the sleep debt's building up, ready to hit me hard one day...

Some nights, I'll be knackered around 11.30pm and looking forward to sleep, but then I get my head down...and get this sudden energy surge and want to listen to music, or start making 'urgent' Brexit stockpiling lists (which never get followed up on the next day). Like insomniac procrastination or something.

Never found booze a big sleep disruptor, personally. In some circumstances, it actually helps.

Does anyone have any tips for falling asleep really quickly? Sometimes, it'd be nice to just turn the lights off and be out for the count in a couple of minutes.
 

luka

Well-known member
Staff member
Stop thinking. That was the game changer for me . Figured it out in my teens. That's what stops you getting to sleep. Just switch it off. It accomplishes nothing. As for not finding booze a problem that's cos you're a horny handed son of toil. Different constitution. Hearty.
 

comelately

Wild Horses
I seem to be fine on 7 for the most part, though occasionally a 9 hour will happen if the opportunity presents itself. Overdoing it exercise wise can make me wired, I need to take theanine if I go gym later in the evening.

Tryptophan taken as a supplement will knock me the fuck out and make me have intense vivid dreams, but then I definitely need 8 hours or I will be groggy af.

It may sound cliched but I'm pretty sure deep breaths and scanning through the body parts (vipassana/yoga nidra) usually works for most if they let it. To begin with you can tense up different body parts then allow them to relax. There's one part in particular that works especially well for guys obviously.

I have slept with The Max Richter piece on a few times, which makes waking up needing to go to the toilet an interesting experience.
 

Leo

Well-known member
I've had really weird dreams when I'm fallen asleep with music on, seems to seep into the subconscious and instigate odd brain patterns.
 
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