Moments in Film

IdleRich

IdleRich
I love the scene in Onibaba when she finally... actually I won't say cos it spoils it... really creepy in context. I think I've mentioned it before but hopefully not in this thread.

 
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IdleRich

IdleRich
Speaking of "how do they do it?" type shots there is the famous one at the end of The Passenger (love that film) which I'm sure has been mentioned on this forum but probably not for ten years or so which I think means I can mention it again.
Actor Maria Schneider’s death yesterday brought to mind a film she starred in with Jack Nicholson in 1975: Michelangelo Antonioni’s The Passenger. Like all of Antonioni’s films, The Passenger uses space, emptiness and architecture to create a sense of spiritual longing in an existential void. The film’s final scene is considered to be one of the great cinematic achievements in the history of the medium—a seamless tracking shot that moves through a gated window enters a courtyard and does a 180 pan and returns to the window from the opposite point of view from which it left, no edits. It was quite some time after the film was released that the method in which it was done became known to film buffs who had been baffled by Antonioni’s seemingly impossible feat. The definitive description of the seven minute long scene
 

WashYourHands

Well-known member
Speaking of "how do they do it?" type shots there is the famous one at the end of The Passenger (love that film) which I'm sure has been mentioned on this forum but probably not for ten years or so which I think means I can mention it again.


Agh, another gem. The framing throughout is exquisite eg the desert-y sections. Perfection.
 

IdleRich

IdleRich
Such a great film.. the scary feeling when you realise that you could just leave your life like that. Really amazing.
I used to go out with a girl who looked so much like (Antonioni's wife) Monica Vitti - one time she saw someone looking at pictures of MV online and she was like "Why are you looking at all those pictures of me? Wait, when was that even taken?" she genuinely thought it was her!

 

IdleRich

IdleRich
Along with The Passenger my favourite existential films are those by Monte Hellman. Love Two Lane Blacktop and - even more maybe - his lesser known film The Shooting. Also Cockfighter too for that matter although that's slightly less penetrating somehow. For example, he never talks but there is this bit where they explain that he's taken a vow of silence for some reason - whereas I think in TLB that would never be made so explicit.
I can't find it online but there is one scene I love in TLB. All through the film GTO (Warren Oates) keeps picking people up and telling them these clearly tall stories about how cool he is and all the great stuff he's done... and then finally there he's speaking to Driver or Mechanic and it seems he's actually telling the truth about how his wife left him and so on and then Mechanic interrupts him and says words to the effect of "Not interested mate".
 

IdleRich

IdleRich
Speaking of red, the first 2mins of this


It's a great film all through. The heist scene which is a kind of homage to.... what is it now? My memory is not what it used to be, a black and white French noir which has this excruciatingly long and slow robbery....
 

version

Who loves ya, baby?
It's a great film all through. The heist scene which is a kind of homage to.... what is it now? My memory is not what it used to be, a black and white French noir which has this excruciatingly long and slow robbery....
Rififi.
 
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