British Farming Post-Brexit

luka

Well-known member
Staff member
You can't tell me we need to ship in a load of Poles when 80% of the country is sitting idle.

These government work teams are necessary and inevitable. For gravedigging yes, but also for fruit picking.
 
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Leo

Well-known member
it's the age-old thing: republican here always complain about foreigners coming and taking our jobs, when of course few natural-born Americans would want to do those jobs such as farming. the good ol' boys at the trump rallies get all fired up about Mexican workers but then cry for federal farm subsidies when their crop rots on the field because there isn't anyone to pick it.

Luka's right, get Harvey Weinstein to pick the lettuce.
 

Leo

Well-known member
Weinstein and Jeffrey Epstein out in the hot field husking corn, that would have been a TMZ home page photo.
 

Mr. Tea

Shub-Niggurath, Please
If I were a famous man with a name ending in -stein I'd be proper bricking it right now, I can tell you.
 

Mr. Tea

Shub-Niggurath, Please
the good ol' boys at the trump rallies get all fired up about Mexican workers but then cry for federal farm subsidies when their crop rots on the field because there isn't anyone to pick it.
While scorning "scroungers" who "rely on government hand-outs", I don't doubt.
 

version

Who loves ya, baby?
My knee jerk response is that British farming should die if the only way it can function is by exploiting foreign workers.
 

Leo

Well-known member
I'd imagine that's pretty much the situation with farming everywhere. You won't find many middle-class locals picking avocados in California.
 

version

Who loves ya, baby?
True, but it's frequently being spun as people being too lazy to do the work when it's actually that the farmers don't want to hire people able to complain about the conditions, pay and so on.
 

Mr. Tea

Shub-Niggurath, Please
My knee jerk response is that British farming should die if the only way it can function is by exploiting foreign workers.
It's tempting to think that way but I don't think your average farmer sits about of an evening counting massive piles of cash and guffawing about how great it is that there's all these Polish farm hands to exploit so he can rake in the profits. By all accounts most farms generate an absolute pittance from actual produce sales and can only stay afloat (for now) because of EU subsidies, much of which are paid for owning land that is not being used for farming, ludicrously enough. And the reason farm gate prices are so low is that we buy nearly all our food from a handful of massive supermarkets who - whether they actually sit together to decide what prices they'll pay or not - effectively form a cartel.

I think you can make a good case that the pickers are being exploited, but when you've got supermarket CEOs on seven-figure salaries and farmers making an average of just two grand a year from actual farming, it's pretty clear who's really doing the exploitation.
 

version

Who loves ya, baby?
Obviously if British farming goes under we'll just end up importing food from places pulling the same shit or even worse so letting it die isn't really a solution.
 

Mr. Tea

Shub-Niggurath, Please
Obviously if British farming goes under we'll just end up importing food from places pulling the same shit or even worse so letting it die isn't really a solution.
Plus if anything goes tits up with the supply chain we'll all end up eating each other, and not in a sexy way.
 

version

Who loves ya, baby?
It's tempting to think that way but I don't think your average farmer sits about of an evening counting massive piles of cash and guffawing about how great it is that there's all these Polish farm hands to exploit so he can rake in the profits. By all accounts most farms generate an absolute pittance from actual produce sales and can only stay afloat (for now) because of EU subsidies, much of which are paid for owning land that is not being used for farming, ludicrously enough. And the reason farm gate prices are so low is that we buy nearly all our food from a handful of massive supermarkets who - whether they actually sit together to decide what prices they'll pay or not - effectively form a cartel.

I think you can make a good case that the pickers are being exploited, but when you've got supermarket CEOs on seven-figure salaries and farmers making an average of just two grand a year from actual farming, it's pretty clear who's really doing the exploitation.
Yeah, that's a fair point. Everyone's trampling on the people directly beneath them.
 

WashYourHands

Active member
Warmers summers, so for the love of god legalise it & let us get on with funding education, mental health & harm reduction.

Read a general scathing review or 3 of certain psychedelic conferences held, but David Nutt's Drug Science got Project Twenty 21 up. Give them some land.
 

version

Who loves ya, baby?
For example, the notion that you can make good money through “piece work,” as has been asserted by both MPs and industry experts, is a fallacy. Unless you have significant prior experience, making anything above the minimum wage is highly unrealistic. After funds are deducted for rent and deposits, our salaries come to about £7 per hour. Furthermore, management’s conduct towards employees has been, at times, appalling. I’ve seen my colleagues berated, degraded and branded “stupid” by their superiors.

The facilities are equally disappointing. Despite being in the throes of a deadly pandemic, the farm owner refuses to supply the bathrooms with hand soap. To save on bills, caravans aren’t hooked up to the mains. Consequently, they have no running water and can get perilously cold at night. We were assured that the caravans would be cleaned before our arrival. Instead, I found a cabin seething with mould and littered with mouse droppings. Mice make dreadful housemates. They are reclusive, dirty, and scarper whenever you suggest they put some money towards bills.

Unfortunately, these issues are common. According to a 2018 report by the Gangmasters and Labour Abuse Authority (GLAA), labour exploitation is on the rise in the UK, and the agricultural industry is one of the worst offenders. As part of a project conducted by the European Union Agency for Fundamental Rights (FRA), researchers identified the most prevalent forms of labour exploitation. These included workers being paid less than promised, fees flowing back to the employer through rent, and reliance on an employer for everything, including food, creating a “dangerous power imbalance.” I’ve witnessed all this and more during my time here.

Whether you see it as symptomatic of a poor English work ethic, or righteous indignation at unjust treatment, the fact is that senior management and the English workers have frequently clashed. Sources of contention have been extremely varied. Staff have taken issue with misogynistic and abusive language, the state of local facilities, and being frequently underpaid. At one point, there were more than 30 Brits here. But after just four weeks, with many unwilling to work under grim conditions for such low pay, we’re now down to five.
 
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