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IdleRich

IdleRich
Or as I put it before...

Another distinction that is fast disappearing but that would be a shame as I think it's quite useful... as also forbear and forebear where it's clearer.

I understand that usage trumps all but it seems a pity when useful distinctions such as disinterested and uninterested - which are now used virtually interchangeably - are flattened out removing some of the subtlety and nuance from the language.

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Clinamenic

θερμοδυναμικός καπιταλιστής
Yeah why is “I missed the meeting which I received no notice of” wrong where “I missed the meeting of which I received no notice” is right? In that case, I actually think the latter sounds better, but I’d hesitate the generalize that reasoning to all such cases.
 

Mr. Tea

Shub-Niggurath, Please
I think it was invented by 18th century grammarians (don't see many of those these days, do you?). The same guys who decided it was really bad to "split infinitives", since infinitives in Latin are a single word, not "to" followed by a verb stem, and English, despite being a Germanic language, ought to conform as closely as possible to a Latin template.

Which is exactly as stupid as it sounds.
 

IdleRich

IdleRich
Yeah why is “I missed the meeting which I received no notice of” wrong where “I missed the meeting of which I received no notice” is right? In that case, I actually think the latter sounds better, but I’d hesitate the generalize that reasoning to all such cases.
I really don't think it is. Even in the case of notoriously flexible rules of language which are subject to change, I think the thing about prepositions was more of an aesthetic suggestion than anything else, as far as I know it never graduated to the status of an actual full-blown rule.
 

IdleRich

IdleRich
While we're on the topic, I found this

One of daftest and dustiest old grammar myths is the unfounded rule against ending a sentence with a preposition. This fake proscription seems to have been invented by a Latin-loving John Dryden in 1672 and, like an indestructible demonic meme, continues to gnaw at people’s minds centuries later. Some even believe it.
Avoiding preposition-stranding (as it’s known) can have deliberately comical results, famously in not-Churchill’s ‘arrant nonsense up with which I will not put’.

I found that while I was looking for that famous sentence which is almost all preposition - or, having found it, apparently it ends with 15 prepositions in a row, except some of them are a con as you will see...

What did you bring me the magazine I didn’t want to be read to out of about “‘Over Under Sideways Down’ up from Down Under” up around for?

Cos surely, in that sentence "down under" is being used in the sense of a nickname for Australia so it's not really a preposition is it? If someone's name was About, then in sentence such as "Hello About, how are you doing?" - About is surely a proper noun, not a preposition... isn't it?
 

IdleRich

IdleRich
Reminds me of an interview that I once read with Christian Bale, he described shadowing (which I suppose is a fancy word for "hanging about with") traders or hedge fund managers and so on in preparation to play Patrick Bateman, the part of it that stuck in my mind was when one of the guys insisted that Bale accompany him to the cashpoint while he withdrew some money cos "you simply won't believe the balance".
 
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