linebaugh

Well-known member
Yes, obviously, when you bring in someone who is an expert at producing or editing, it is going to sound or read better than if you don't. Nobody is disputing this. This goes without saying.
More likely they would never have been signed in the first place and their music just wouldn't exist.

I don't think there's a trend of signed label bands skipping out on producers. This is not a thing I've ever heard of. Obviously some musicians learn their own production chops and slowly gain the authority to engineer their own music. But all this is completely separate from digital vs analog questions
youve misunderstood me. what Im saying is the that the current trend in producing is one that leaves the touch of the producer absent. its not a matter of talent. when you take away that touch often all youre left with is 4 idiots in a garage.
 

linebaugh

Well-known member
misfits ire the perfect example. theyd be an awful band if they were recorded how most bands are recorded today
 
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linebaugh

Well-known member
its not like whoever produced the misfits knew what they were doing or was talented at it, but he still performed an essential role in keeping danzig, one of the biggest goofs alive, at a comtorable distance.
 

linebaugh

Well-known member
but the misfits are cool and were able to maintain that. thats my main gripe with how bands are produced. its not cool at all and thats not really anything that can be scienced away and why gus rejects my premise.
 

martin

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You never get MP3s with mobile phone static on them anymore – used to be a common hazard back in the Audiogalaxy days.

I’ve got a few CDs that’ve been eaten up by bronzing and glitch like crazy. Quite a few early ‘90s UK industrial releases (Skullflower, NWW, Whitehouse, Current 93, etc) pressed by PDO were affected. I’ve got a copy of “Another Crack Of The White Whip” by Whitehouse that’s OK for four songs, then the sound starts ‘flickering’ and falling apart. Possibly a sign of collector scum insanity that some unplayable, completely disc-rotten Death In June CDs from that era still go for top dollar on Discogs.

Fleetwood Mac’s “Everywhere” has a high-pitched channel hiss in the left ear that you can’t unhear once you’ve noticed it. Sounds like a busted cable.

I read something ages ago about how the bass on the first three Stranglers albums sounded that way because of some fault with JJ Burnel’s amp, and that when the amp packed in, he tried to ‘fuck up’ the new one to recapture the sound, but never did.

One of my favourite punk tunes (and a great example of four idiots in a garage) is “We’re You” by Clockwork Criminals, where the bass and guitar are so out of tune (on their own and with each other) it accidentally gives the song an edge it probably wouldn’t have had if they’d bothered to tune up. By the way, not bigging this up as a ‘haha, great racket, fuck serious musos’ comment – I genuinely think this song sounds awesome.

 

william_kent

Well-known member
@martin 's post above reminded me of this passage from "The Story of Hex Induction Hour", a book which could teach the tennis racket wielding poseur who wrote Infinite Jest a thing or two about footnotes...

Another significant difference is that the Dragnet version, like much of the LP, is so clearly out of tune that you could be forgiven for suspecting it must be deliberate. [18]

[18 ] Scottish band The fire Engines certainly believed it - they later admitted the 'technique' of having one guitar slightly off-pitch on their earliest singles. Not that Mark was flattered by the imitation. In 1982 he commented, 'Like you get all these Scottish bands in England, they do 15 -20 minutes and they're not even in tune at the end of their fucking set.' In any case, the fact that The Fall stopped sounding like that immediately after Will Sergeant from Echo & The Bunnemen introduced them to the electronic guitar tuner is all you need to know.
 

suspended

Well-known member
youve misunderstood me. what Im saying is the that the current trend in producing is one that leaves the touch of the producer absent. its not a matter of talent. when you take away that touch often all youre left with is 4 idiots in a garage.
Dear Kindly Sir, Mr. John Linebaugh. It is you who misunderstand me. For indeed,, this was precisely my point, and I understood your every word from inception.

Sincerely and with great contrition at the necessity of correcting so estimable a gentleman,
 

luka

Well-known member
Dear Kindly Sir, Mr. John Linebaugh. It is you who misunderstand me. For indeed,, this was precisely my point, and I understood your every word from inception.

Sincerely and with great contrition at the necessity of correcting so estimable a gentleman,
Gus, do you like this song?

 

william_kent

Well-known member
What was the Dragnet tune?

Paul Hanley, ex-Fall drummer and author of Have A Bleeding Guess - The Story of Hex Induction Hour is talking about the Dragnet version of 'Put Away', as compared to the 27/11/1978 John Peel Show version in that quote above...


The Fall - Put Away ( Peel session 1978 )


The Fall - Put Away ( dragnet 1979 )
 

martin

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Paul Hanley, ex-Fall drummer and author of Have A Bleeding Guess - The Story of Hex Induction Hour is talking about the Dragnet version of 'Put Away', as compared to the 27/11/1978 John Peel Show version in that quote above...


The Fall - put Away ( Peel session 1978 )
Ah OK. Should say I don't have a clue about tuning myself, lol. But would go for the Dragnet version...the Peel one sounds so slow and plodding (to these dodgy ears anyway...never liked Mess of My either...)
 

william_kent

Well-known member
Ah OK. Should say I don't have a clue about tuning myself, lol. But would go for the Dragnet version...the Peel one sounds so slow and plodding (to these dodgy ears anyway...never liked Mess of My either...)

yeah, Dragnet version wins out for me as well...but I'm tone deaf, etc.,
 
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