Droid's Sequential Art Top 50

luka

Moderator
There's a great bit in the in all where the personality breaks down into its component parts. And they start arguing with each other
 

droid

Beast of Burden
Batman Year 100



Perhaps the only mainstream superhero entry here is Paul Pope's 2006 entry into the DC comics universe. Pope began his career in the mid 90s with self published work Heavy Liquid and the the excellent tank girl/big hero 6 adjacent THB, and then landed a job with manage publisher Kodansha, a very unusual career trajectory for an American independent creator. The striking thing about year 100 is the radical reinterpretation of such a well known character. Pope's Batman is ragged, squashed, sweaty and unkempt. It's sci-fi, but in the Alien mode, filthy and lived in...

"I wanted to present a new take on Batman, who is without a doubt a mythic figure in our pop-psyche. My Batman is not only totally science fiction, he's also a very physical superhero: he bleeds, he sweats, he eats. He's someone born into an overarching police state; someone with the body of David Beckham, the brain of Tesla, and the wealth of Howard Hughes... pretending to be Nosferatu."
Only a four issue short unfortunately, but IMO probably the only really essential Batman since the Dark Knight.

Read: https://drive.google.com/open?id=1sAc61Usy2JAF6Iu8RrWEA5V1MlCjFjB3
Buy: https://www.comixology.eu/Batman-Year-100-Other-Tales-Deluxe-Edition/digital-comic/288890








 
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droid

Beast of Burden
2001 Nights



A contemporary of Katsuhiro Otomo, the criminally undertranslated Yukinobu Hoshino is widely admired in Japan yet only a handful of his works are available in English. I picked up the three volume set of 2001 nights in the mid-90s, and became an instant fan, not only of the intricate realism of his fude brushwork, but also for the portentous overtones and stringently observed hard sci-fi themes. First published in japan in 1984, 2001 Nights is the story of humanity’s exploration of the universe. Told in a series of nineteen episodes, each successive 'night' represents a milestone in the gradual journey. An unusually strait laced manga epic, the narrative framework is (as the name suggests) taken from 1001 nights and Hoshino is also clearly familiar with the sci-fi canon, the influence of Arthur C Clarke is obvious, but other examples abound. Night 14 references Heinlein’s The Moon is a Harsh Mistress, the vast rainforests and oceans of sand in Odyssey in Green' (Night 18) is a deliberate pastiche of Philip José Farmer’s novel, The Green Odyssey. and there are also winks to the works of Asimov, Bradbury, Lem, and others. This is an essential set of tales for sci fi fans, executed with exquisite style and poignancy by a master draughtsman and storyteller, and occasionally surpassing its many influences.

Read: https://drive.google.com/open?id=1-3R-OHcaGAGlNlNy1UaRZiiD_YIZqm_J
Buy: Cant be bought new anywhere afaik.



















 
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sadmanbarty

New member
i like that rocket chopped up by the panels. i'm a sucker for a single image divided into panels.

you're right about the use of space in manga. everything's a splash page or two tiny panels and then a massive one. is that to do with how they sell manga? do they not sell it in floppies, which means artists don't have to be economic?
 

droid

Beast of Burden
Its generally much more influenced by film with use of pacing to increase tension and drama and far more more cinematic in terms of plot delivery. Show dont tell, narration, but almost never thought balloons. Japan was about 20/30 years ahead of the West in that regard, apart from the Europeans and a few iconoclasts like Miller, who borrowed heavily from manga.
 

sadmanbarty

New member
Its generally much more influenced by film with use of pacing to increase tension and drama and far more more cinematic in terms of plot delivery. Show dont tell, narration, but almost never thought balloons. Japan was about 20/30 years ahead of the West in that regard, apart from the Europeans and a few iconoclasts like Miller, who borrowed heavily from manga.
in the early 2000's i guess there was a trend for 'widescreen' comics in the west; panels layouts that were just three rows and all that. the cinematic analogy is quite common with that kind of thing.
 

droid

Beast of Burden
in the early 2000's i guess there was a trend for 'widescreen' comics in the west; panels layouts that were just three rows and all that. the cinematic analogy is quite common with that kind of thing.
Yeah, 2000s. This is Tezuka from 1947. Reads right to left.

 

Corpsey

call me big papa
Is there an ideal digital medium through which to read comics?

I'm assuming a tablet is probably the answer.
 

droid

Beast of Burden
A high res tablet like an Ipad Pro is probably best.

TBH though, unlike almost every other medium, I think traditional generally can't be beaten when it comes to comics.
 
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