IdleRich

IdleRich
It's a magazine/comic that looks like a kids' thing but is in fact filled with a mixture of childish nonsense and fart jokes - and occasional moments of laugh out loud genius. And it's been around forever, never changing, a kinda British institution like Carry On or something.
 

WashYourHands

Well-known member
Year? Decades or gtfo

Seriously though @Bad Faith Healer i find Friday night about 10pm to be the most insightful

You’re check-listing a day, knackered as fuck, but a week too, the month, where it’s going right and wrong. Typical lapsed catholic pondering, except a porthole appears and you get to look through for an hour. Like you might practice with particular teas and protein
 

woops

is not like other people
why they called it "lockdown" not just quarantine
???

lockdown previously to all this used to be security jargon used in prison context for example?
who decided to use that negative claustrophobia-inducing term ?

instead of calm and sanitary "quarantine" ffs :mad:?
'cos they're following the science
 

sufi

осом
why they called it "lockdown" not just quarantine
???

lockdown previously to all this used to be security jargon used in prison context for example?
who decided to use that negative claustrophobia-inducing term ?

instead of calm and sanitary "quarantine" ffs :mad:?

so authoritarian, so victimising - i wonder who came up with it - whether it's deliberately chosen for maximum effect in the pandemic response planning

1615415455871.png

 

sufi

осом

Lockdown - United States Navy

https://www.ready.navy.mil/be_informed/emergency_actions/lockdown_procedures.html
A Lockdown, similar to Shelter in Place (SIP), is a temporary sheltering technique utilized to limit exposure to a threat, usually an Anti-Terrorism Force Protection (ATFP) incident, i.e. an Active Shooter incident. It is the immediate movement or removal of all personnel from the outside to inside structures.

lockdown lŏk′doun″
►​

  • n.

    A protocol followed in an emergency that involves confining people in a secure place, such as the confinement of prison inmates in cells after a disturbance, or the locking of students and teachers in classrooms after a violent attack.
  • n.

    A situation in which this protocol is undertaken.
More at Wordnik from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

Lockout? Lockdown? Understanding school safety terms in ...

https://www.democratandchronicle.co...-shelter-place-hold-place-evacuate/555744002/
Lockdown This means school buildings and grounds are locked if there is a threat of violence in or near the school. All students from hallways or common areas should be taken into nearby...

What is the difference between hold-and-secure and a lockdown?

https://www.thestar.com/news/crime/...nce_between_holdandsecure_and_a_lockdown.html
6 Oct 2014In a lockdown situation, students would be kept in classrooms or other designated spots away from the threat, where access and visibility is minimized. Staff members, responsible for the safety of...

Is there a legal definition for a "lockdown facility" in ...

https://in.answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20141109190623AAbAfWG
A locked unit, wing or floor of a facility is a form of restraint; Only residents who require a type of secured environment based on a physician's diagnosis and written order and on other...

What is Respondus Monitor? | Respondus Lockdown Browser ...

https://utlv.screenstepslive.com/s/faculty/m/lockdown/l/198690-what-is-respondus-monitor
Respondus Lockdown Browser is based off Internet Explorer for Windows and Safari for Mac, and uses those browsers to render web pages. If you suspect a problem, and you wish to have your college dean or department chair review a video, you can simply add that person to your course, and they will have access to the session recordings.

What's the difference between a school lockdown and a ...

https://globalnews.ca/news/2302028/...ween-a-school-lockdown-and-a-hold-and-secure/
A lockdown is a more extreme procedure, when a threat is near or inside a school.






from
https://duckduckgo.com/?q=lockdown&t=newext&atb=v221-1&df=2000-03-09..2019-03-10&ia=web = search results on "lockdown" from 2000-2019
 

sufi

осом
Although the term "social distancing" was not introduced until the 21st century,[14] social-distancing measures date back to at least the 5th century BC. The Bible contains one of the earliest known references to the practice in the Book of Leviticus 13:46: "And the leper in whom the plague is... he shall dwell alone; [outside] the camp shall his habitation be."[15] During the Plague of Justinian of 541 to 542, Emperor Justinian enforced an ineffective quarantine on the Byzantine Empire, including dumping bodies into the sea; he predominantly blamed the widespread outbreak on "Jews, Samaritans, pagans, heretics, Arians, Montanists and homosexuals".[16] In modern times, social distancing measures have been successfully implemented in several epidemics. In St. Louis, shortly after the first cases of influenza were detected in the city during the 1918 flu pandemic, authorities implemented school closures, bans on public gatherings and other social-distancing interventions. The influenza fatality rates in St. Louis were much less than in Philadelphia, which had fewer cases of influenza but allowed a mass parade to continue and did not introduce social distancing until more than two weeks after its first cases.[17]

The World Health Organization (WHO) has suggested using the term "physical distancing" instead of "social distancing" because it is physical separation which prevents transmission; people can remain socially connected by meeting outdoors at a safe distance (when there is no stay-at-home order) and by meeting via technology.[2][3][18][19]

Cordon sanitaire


Main article: Cordon sanitaire (medicine)

In 1995, a cordon sanitaire was used to control an outbreak of Ebola virus disease in Kikwit, Zaire.[68][69][70] President Mobutu Sese Seko surrounded the town with troops and suspended all flights into the community. Inside Kikwit, the World Health Organization and Zaire's medical teams erected further cordons sanitaires, isolating burial and treatment zones from the general population and successfully containing the infection.[71]


Protective sequestration​


Main article: Protective sequestration

During the 1918 influenza epidemic, the town of Gunnison, Colorado, isolated itself for two months to prevent an introduction of the infection. Highways were barricaded and arriving train passengers were quarantined for five days. As a result of the isolation, no one died of influenza in Gunnison during the epidemic.[72] Several other communities adopted similar measures.[73]




History​


Leper colonies and lazarettos were established as a means of preventing the spread of leprosy and other contagious diseases through social distancing,[76] until transmission was understood and effective treatments invented.

The term lockdown was used by the media and the World Health Organization (WHO) to describe the action taken in January 2020 by the government of China to restrict movements of people in order to control the outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in Wuhan.[7][8] When Italian authorities imposed a strict quarantine order in the northern part of the country, the media also used the term lockdown, which was used for Spain and France, as well as other countries around the world.[9][10][11][12] Although it is not a technical term in public health or laws, the media continued to use lockdown to describe the actions taken by these governments.[13] As the lockdowns were expanded to other countries, there was a shift in the definitions. Measures are less restrictive and other terms emerged in attempts to differentiate from the most restrictive measure in China.[5]

Australia​

In Melbourne and Sydney, the term iso, shortened from self-isolation, is often colloquially used by young people to refer to stay-at-home orders.[citation needed]
 

catalog

Well-known member
yeah the lockdown vs quarantine thing is interesting - authoritarian and american influence. or did it originate in wuhan? maybe also because it makes more "intuitive" sense ie the words make sense for what it effectively is?

think i mentioned before but quarantine originates from "40" as in 40 days, but who would understand that intuitively?

also maybe never stuck cos it was more than 40 days?

But you're right - that term doesn't help the conspiracy angle.
 

Leo

Well-known member
I think a distinction is certain people are asked to quarantine for 10-14 days if they've been exposed to someone with COVID, travelled to certain areas, etc., whereas lockdown is a government order to be followed by everyone for a certain period. here, we've had a few brief periods of lockdown in certain states where rates surge, and they ask people to only go out for essential food shopping, etc. we haven't been in lockdown for all of the past year.
 

catalog

Well-known member
over here it's been "lockdown" all the way. and "self-isolating" for 14 or 10 days if exposed to someone.

so we had a tier system for a while, instead of national lockdown, but even then "quarantine" wasn't used.

I think it is the spelling and the fact that it no longer makes immediate sense on it's own, whereas "lockdown" tells people what to do.

but the wider thing, like sufi said, more generally, is the use of words to impose/control.

i think that is the whole attitude particularly here in GB... health and safety culture hangover from the 1970s - it's all about inculcating fear, rather than educating and informing. Restriction the favoured approach, which only encourages people to break rules. i was talking about it the other day to a friend on a different topic, swimming in reservoirs. in france, people are allowed to swim in all the reservoirs, there are safety notices, but people are trusted. here. it's all "cold water kills" and "no swimming" notices, even though it can be done if you know some safety basics.
 

Leo

Well-known member
yeah, it's been different here. we've had plenty of government screwups, but never the weird, constantly changing rules like in the UK. we've never been disallowed to meet people outdoors, aside from the initial brief lockdown period at the beginning when everyone was totally freaked out. throughout 2020, you could hang out at a park or in someone's yard. it was recommended that we wear a mask and social distance, but police where never authorized to enforce it. people were encouraged not to travel and self-isolate afterwards if they did, but that too was never enforced as law.

from the outside, it seemed like Boris was always coming up with new plans, with all sorts of arcane guidelines: people over six-feet tall are only allowed to go outside on the second Tuesday of every month (I exaggerate).

our main problem is states make their own rules, so one state can have a mask mandate but the one next door doesn't...and obviously, people travel freely between the two.
 
Last edited:

sufi

осом
from those wikipedias it seemed like the term was first used in a pejorative sense about China, and then it backfired onto the anglosphere when the corona turned pandemic

i wonder though how deliberately governments have adopted it, how far it betrays their security mindset
 
Top