thirdform

Well-known member
biscuits didn't ask for more pay and now he can't pay off his debt even though he could have gone to open university. what a clueless man when it comes to finances. even more illiterate than my late granny who was actually illiterate. what a joke. farcical.
 

thirdform

Well-known member
now he'll convince us he didn't pay tuition fees. All lies! he is a man condemned! even mummy and daddy biscuits are furious with him.
 

john eden

male pale and stale
Won't people doing this just get moved on to a prepaid meter? Seems like a pretty bad idea tbh. Guess if you can't afford to pay though it makes no difference either way.
Well the first action is mass cancellation of direct debits and a request for pay me t by other means. So it looks like there are a bunch of ways to get involved with the campaign.

75,000 pledges so far and rising. They can’t fit that many prepaid meters.

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mixed_biscuits

_________________________
You are an anon though. for all its worth you could be in Australia and your name could be Jolyon.
Incidentally, those two things are both correct but the fact is my contention is also expressed by several economic luminaries in the article referenced
 

Leo

Well-known member
“The government has lost control of the British economy — and for what? They’ve crashed the pound — and for what?” Mr. Starmer asked. “Not for working people: for tax cuts for the richest 1 percent in our society.”

In his 50-minute address, Mr. Starmer promised that Labour would tackle a crisis over the rising cost of living, create a new state-owned clean energy company and expand homeownership. But his speech aimed less at outlining new policies and more at presenting his party as a competent government-in-waiting whose moment had arrived.

The contrast with previous Labour party conferences — usually fractious affairs with internal divisions fully on display — was striking. Even last year Mr. Starmer was under pressure for his shift to the center, prompting opposition from left-wing party members who interrupted his conference speech with heckling.

This time, Mr. Starmer was greeted with a standing ovation, the first of many, even before he had uttered a word. It was a display of unity that suggests that the party scents the prospect of power for the first time in many years.

 

IdleRich

IdleRich

both very funny and not funny at all

Happened to be kinda absently reading this randomly at 0416 and this bit jumped out at me

"Normally when politicians lie these days, it is to spin a fantasy their supporters feel inspired to embrace"

A bizarre claim. Mainly because the topic is way too bit to sum up with a "normally" like that - there is nothing that can encompass and summarise what our politicians normally lie about. "Normally" they lie to exaggerate what they will do, they lie to cover up what they've done, they lie to get their enemies in trouble and they lie to keep their friends out of jail. They lie about the work they've done and which meetings they attended and who they met and whether they know them and what they knew when and whether they said something at a certain time. They lie about the football teams they support and the music they like and the places they go on holiday and the houses they live in and the other jobs they have right now - or had in the past (to make them sound better) or will have in the future (to pretend there won't be any conflict of interest) - and the money they earn from them and the taxes they pay on it. And cos of all this they lie about the lies they've already told, they lie to say that they never told that lie and then they lie to say that they didn't know the truth and so that lie that they've lied about not telling wasn't a lie anyway, and they get some other liars to tell some more lies about those lies and to try and distract from them by telling some other lies about someone else and.. in short, normally when politicians lie these days, they lie about lies, cos their business is lies, the whole fucking thing is a big fucking bunch of lying liars lying to each other and, much much more importantly, lying to us, about every fucking thing.

Though of course, the one untouchable, unbreakable tenet of the ministerial code is that, under no circumstances must you say that one of the other members of parliament is a liar. And right now it feels as though this completely bizarre rule - which ironically prevents any member from truthfully describing a huge amount of what passes before them - is a sort of keystone holding up the whole edifice of lies.
 
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