Do you trust the food you eat?

version

Who loves ya, baby?
You ever worry what's actually in your food? How much attention do you pay to nutritional information? Does food seem to be of increasingly poor quality? If so, does that bother you?
 

Mr. Tea

Shub-Niggurath, Please
In general I think it's OK in this country but much of that is due to those dreadful EU regulations that we all hate so much, so god knows what it'll be like in a year's time.
 

mixed_biscuits

_________________________
What I do try to watch out for is any change in my mood after eating new foods; there are some things that definitely knock me out of whack.
 

IdleRich

IdleRich
God, I hate these bastards.
Yep. When I saw IDS describing fears that a deal with the US would lower food standards as "lefty claptrap" - even though it fucking obviously
would - my hands involuntarily twitched to the extent that I almost smashed them through the telly.
 

version

Who loves ya, baby?
I think they've even gone as far as to suggest it's racist to take issue with American food standards...
 

IdleRich

IdleRich
Food quality here is strange. People do take their food very seriously indeed (one of my friends was telling me that if a few Portuguese meet up under any circumstances, be it a business trip involving strangers, or a shopping trip amongst friends or whatever, the first matter of business will always be a heated discussion of where they should go for lunch) but it's frustratingly common to find manky veg and even meat for sale in the supermarket. Sometimes you will see packets on the shelves containing actual moldy meat, or, more commonly, you buy things that have a best before that is supposed to be quite some time in the future, only to find that they are inedible long before that.
My guess (and it is only a guess) is that they use less preservatives and this is the inevitable result. The main thing is that you have to carefully check everything you buy to make sure that it's all good (I mean if you have a receipt you can take it back but it's so easy to forget or take too long or lose the receipt and be unable to prove when you bought it and so forth - in which case it's extremely frustrating to waste food/money in that way).
But in general, the actual food that you eat does seem to be of a good quality, both in terms of taste and nutrition and so on. Though I don't really check it in much detail.
Or are you talking about watching calories and so on? In which case, I dunno, I just think about everything in moderation really. I mean, there is no single item that I won't eat on occasion (I love cooking or simply eating in a restaurant things dripping in fat) but there are loads of things that I obviously wouldn't eat every day. I don't notice any decrease in quality as such... but I'm assuming that question was more about the UK...?
At the moment I'm more concerned about the lack of the chance to play sports cos of the lockdown and stuff, if I feel out of condition my instinct is always towards doing more exercise (or trying to at least) rather than to attempt to reduce any of my appetites. I know it doesn't really work like that but in my heart it does.
 

IdleRich

IdleRich
I think they've even gone as far as to suggest it's racist to take issue with American food standards...
Well the people shovelling their faces full of chlorinated chicken in enormous and poisonous portions obviously don't think that American Lives Matter.
 

IdleRich

IdleRich
Have you ever seen that programme called, er, I think Drive-Ins, Diners, Dives or something like that with three Ds anyway? I only saw it when I moved here so maybe it's not well known, but the basic premise is that strange looking guy with bleached hair drives around the US stopping at restaurants that are deemed to fit the above description - they visit various towns and pick visit the ones that are most legendary or succesful in each case. And by the end of each programme I pretty much feel sick - It's not that the programme itself is bad, or even that the food that they cover is not good (or at least tasty); it's just that they seem to focus on the richest, fattiest and greasiest dishes in the most ludicrously unhealthy restaurants they can find. Each one often looks good (well, some do and some don't of course, but certainly there are plenty of places I would no doubt visit regularly if I lived within striking distance) but cumulatively the effect is so overwhelming... after half an hour the viewer is left with the impression that the US is drowning in deep frying batter and populated by eating maniacs who only pause from stuffing their face to waddle from one all-you-can-eat ghee-butter-fried lasagne place to the next. You see the chefs doing their speciality sauces and rubs and so on and then they make something that you think looks great - and then they put it in-between two slices of deep fried bread and spread clotted cream all over it or something. It's just MORE of everything. Especially sandwiches, I remember seeing one "meat special" and it had, I dunno chicken and pork and ham and bacon and beef and pastrami... it's entirely about more, there is no way that you can differentiate what you're tasting in something like that, it's there simply to be have every type of meat in it or whatever. Like in Cosmopolis where he buys the most expensive flat in the world simply to have done so... the number you pay is what you're paying for... you pay more to have paid more because it's a bigger number.
Of course, I understand that that is not American food culture in total, but it does seem to be a very real seam that does run through it. I'm not sure how big it is but I reckon too big. I mean I know this is all obvious and we read about it all the time but seeing it celebrated is, like I said, truly overwhelming.
 

luka

Well-known member
Staff member
dont they say fruit and vegetables have had all the nutrients bred out of them and replaced with sugar and tartrazine?
 
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