luka

Well-known member
sure, sure but i do think its completely normal to have a sense of dread about this, some repress it more thoroughly and ruthlessly than others thats all
 

luka

Well-known member
and i have had mad constant pains in my left hand chest area the whole time which doesnt help. and my friends arm wont stop twitching
 

craner

Beast of Burden
I did some cursory research and thought on the balance of things it seemed worth a shot. However, my fiance and her family have refused to take it, but they are anti-vaxxers anyway and have been for decades. The different type of anti-vaxxers are marked here though: my partner worries about the fact that the vaccine was rushed and is an unknown quantity; her mother thinks it is a threat to health and civil liberties and you'd be safer taking more Vitamin C; her aunt thinks it is all to do with Bill Gates and the Global Reset. That's the full spectrum.

What this has demonstrated, though, is how spurious and subjective and corrupt the notion of 'expertise' is. The aunt and the mother have all done their "research" and have a entire canon of renegade doctors, health specialists, professors, etc. who have apparently been banished from the MSM but are bravely speaking out. They have facts and arguments and names to throw around, but who knows how to verify any of these experts or cranks? I don't and I don't think they do, either.
 

Mr. Tea

Shub-Niggurath, Please
and i have had mad constant pains in my left hand chest area the whole time which doesnt help. and my friends arm wont stop twitching
Pain near the injection site is one of the most common side effects. If you really think you're having a serious abreaction then FFS, stop bleating to us and call 111.
 

WashYourHands

Well-known member
and i have had mad constant pains in my left hand chest area the whole time which doesnt help. and my friends arm wont stop twitching

maybe a GP appointment as a first step to check blood pressure and resting pulse, you can always find the pulse on your neck and count for 60secs, 911 can be more like a conversational cuppa checklist while a GP is observing in real time

if you‘re hitting the proverbial drinks cabinet and/or smoking in boiling weather, as a 40something better to check in with primary care first

I understand this doesn’t address whether the discomfort came on post-jab but GP’s want to know just as much as you do to see of your left arm has a wifi signal
 

version

Well-known member
it doesnt really belong here particularly but i have been very taken by the way this medical language has been taken up by everyone invested in the debate, a kind of arms race logic. my cousins spout this gibberish too and also have no scientific qualifications or aptitude. not that i think we should listen to scientists, i don't, i think we should kill them.
The same thing's happened with the language of "self-care" and therapy, lots of people using terms like "gaslight" and "trauma". Trump was "gaslighting" the American public.

I saw something a while back along the lines of loads of abusive people go into therapy now and just come out with a whole new vocabulary and toolkit they can use to that end.
 

catalog

Well-known member
Like people going to jail and becoming career criminals. I've heard people drop stuff in conversations that I think they must've learned in therapy.
 

version

Well-known member
I think the thing that most unnerves me is the confidence with which people use language they've only recently encountered. They pick it up and start using it like it's something they've always done.
 

DLaurent

Well-known member
I sometimes have anxiety even when speaking in my native English tongue, that I'm not going to be understood, and am pretty amazed by how we've learned to communicate. It's quite a simple thing when it comes to the depth of human ingenuity to ask for something from a shop for example. I did German at school and went to stay with a family in Munich on a trip but ended up speaking English most of the time, though I did get off with a fine Bavarian girl called Claudia despite the language barrier.
 

WashYourHands

Well-known member
The same thing's happened with the language of "self-care" and therapy, lots of people using terms like "gaslight" and "trauma". Trump was "gaslighting" the American public.

I saw something a while back along the lines of loads of abusive people go into therapy now and just come out with a whole new vocabulary and toolkit they can use to that end.


 

linebaugh

Well-known member
The same thing's happened with the language of "self-care" and therapy, lots of people using terms like "gaslight" and "trauma". Trump was "gaslighting" the American public.

I saw something a while back along the lines of loads of abusive people go into therapy now and just come out with a whole new vocabulary and toolkit they can use to that end.
what unnerves me about these trends is that, particularly online, it seems like its the word/phrases themselves that motivate speech. mimetic desire. you see the new phrase and then think up something that will allow you to use it in context.
 

version

Well-known member
Finally watched Once Upon A Time In Hollywood the other day and noticed people seem incapable of discussing it without using the term "love letter".
 

linebaugh

Well-known member
not that 'love letter' is one of those phrases, but I'm constantly frustrated by what feels like walls of expression. Typing something out and hating it but being at a complete loss of how else to say it any other way. Most of thats probably on me but I do think sometimes we approach genuine limits.
 
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