The Culture War

version

Who loves ya, baby?
I know some people are just that stupid, but that's also the sort of thing which makes me think there are people sympathetic to the right embedded within the left fomenting discord.
 

version

Who loves ya, baby?
 

version

Who loves ya, baby?
Now there's another group looking to start up a Fox News equivalent alongside Murdoch's.
Andrew Cole, one of the co-founders of GB News, also sits on the board of Liberty Global. He told the Guardian he hoped to be able to discuss the project in September, but he has previously made clear his views on the broadcasting landscape.

He told his LinkedIn followers that the BBC was “possibly the most biased propaganda machine in the world” and to “watch out for announcements of famous presenters and the launch of a completely new TV news channel for the UK – one that will be distinctly different from the out-of-touch incumbents”. He added: “The people need and want this new perspective.”
 

constant escape

winter withered, warm
But then again, at least here in the US, there seems to be more and more talk about reconciling with the other side. There was talk about it at both the Democratic and Republican conventions.

That said, would such sentiments be enough to resist the market opportunities offered by increased polarization? What about the markets of bipartisanship?
 

constant escape

winter withered, warm
Yeah, cause it enables them to live as a protagonist against some enemy? Tough to argue otherwise. That adversarial energy has to be channelled somehow, and sports don't cut it at this scale.
 

version

Who loves ya, baby?
My first thought was markets. If everyone's cooperating you've more competition. If you pit them against one another then you've opened up a load of new ones.
 

version

Who loves ya, baby?
Well, look at the US. You've got CNN, MSNBC, CBS etc all treading on each other's toes whereas Fox dominate their market.
 

constant escape

winter withered, warm
Do markets develop such that they split up, or such that they merge? Or both?

I guess the producers would want to minimize competition, in principle, and secure their own private market, but does the macro-global-market want that?

And I guess the adversarial energy can be preserved into the depolarized/bipartisan market, and the enemy would just be anyone who seeks to split the people up, from either side.
 

vimothy

yurp
a monopolistic market structure depends on the type of good produced - if it can easily be substituted for other goods, its not a good candidate for a monopoly
 

Leo

Well-known member
But then again, at least here in the US, there seems to be more and more talk about reconciling with the other side. There was talk about it at both the Democratic and Republican conventions.

That said, would such sentiments be enough to resist the market opportunities offered by increased polarization? What about the markets of bipartisanship?

maybe we didn't watch the same conventions but I saw possibly more bitter polarization than ever before. biden campaign made efforts to reach moderate republican voters by having Kasich and others on, but that traditional GOP voter isn't Trump's GOP base. and the GOP convention demonized the Dems as police-hating socialists who want to abolish the suburbs and destroy freedoms.

I've read that historically, Fox News has had higher ratings when the Dems control the White House and/or Congress compared to when the GOP is in power. Viewers prefer to watch "fight the power" more than "support the administration".
 

version

Who loves ya, baby?
I've read that historically, Fox News has had higher ratings when the Dems control the White House and/or Congress compared to when the GOP is in power.
I've heard the same of gun sales. They sell far more when the country's being run by a Dem they can claim's perpetually on the brink of taking them away.
 

Leo

Well-known member
well, rich people in posh suburbs have to defend themselves when MS-13 moves in next door, right?
 
Top