Francis Bacon: A Brush with Violence (2017)

luka

Well-known member
Staff member
the most interesting thing about Hirst is the way he's taking the piss out of art and meaning. it's like South Park. brattishly cynical.
 
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version

Who loves ya, baby?
Hirst says he was essentially trying to make some of the spaces from Bacon's paintings at times. He's in the film.
 
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Corpsey

call me big papa
the most interesting thing about Hirst is the way he's taking the piss out of art and meaning. it's like South Park. brattishly cynical.
Taking the piss seems to be fairly conventional in modern art. It's one big is it or isn't it a joke.
 

version

Who loves ya, baby?
your old friend who literally only just appeared late last night`?
I know them from another site. I sent them the blog and they made their way here. I had an inkling and they messaged me later last night.
 

luka

Well-known member
Staff member
i mentioned on here that last time i looked at them in real life they had a cartoonish quality. not horrifc or morbided or frightening at all. more like looney tunes really
Should edit this to say Disney instead of Looney Tunes now
 

Corpsey

call me big papa
"Bacon’s art is, in effect, conformist. It is not with Goya or the early Eisenstein that he should be compared, but with Walt Disney. Both men make propositions about the alienated behaviour of our societies; and both, in a different way, persuade the viewer to accept what is. Disney makes alienated behaviour look funny and sentimental and therefore, acceptable. Bacon interprets such behaviour in terms of the worst possible having already happened, and so proposes that both refusal and hope are pointless. The surprising formal similarities of their work — the way limbs are distorted, the overall shapes of bodies, the relation of figures to background and to one another, the use of neat tailor’s clothes, the gesture of hands, the range of colours used - are the result of both men having complementary attitudes to the same crisis.

Disney’s world is also charged with vain violence. The ultimate catastrophe is always in the offing. His creatures have both personality and nervous reactions: what they lack (almost) is mind. If, before a cartoon sequence by Disney, one read and believed the caption, There is nothing else, the fi lm would strike us as horrifically as a painting by Bacon.

Bacon’s paintings do not comment, as is often said, on any actual experience of loneliness, anguish or metaphysical doubt; nor do they comment on social relations, bureaucracy, industrial society or the history of the 20th century. To do any of these things they would have to be concerned with consciousness. What they do is to demonstrate how alienation may provoke a longing for its own absolute form—which is mindlessness. This is the consistent truth demonstrated, rather than expressed, in Bacon’s work."
 
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