IdleRich

IdleRich
Nice synchronicity in that I come back in and go to put a record on. But first I have to clear away whatever disc it is that lazy girlfriend has left on the turntable and hunt down its sleeve so they're not separated forever. And it's Caberet Voltaire - What Is Real (Virtual Reality Mix) neatly enough.
 

WashYourHands

Well-known member
Have to return to Mr Kirk. There's a glut of mid/late 80's listening to slap on the virtual platter and i've just spent the last 90mins trying to distil 5 monster RHK lp's down to a few tracks. Fuckin mare, plus they'll sound more even if this shifts chronologically.

A few that arose via the depths thread and a few that didn't. First up was caught by chance. My folks were out somewhere like the pub and Herzog's Nosferatu pinged on the tv. It's an uneven film and i was lost in Isabelle Adjani's crystal blue eyes and black hair, might have even been weighing up a wank (bless me father for i have sinned). Cut to the scene where Bruno Ganz is walking along water. Everything riffs on the sketchy. Is he being followed? Popol Vuh's soundtrack is heavy in itself, such ominous tension, a band explored much more deeply a few years later. Then, as Ganz journeys upward, he stops within/overlooking mountains. The mood shifts to awe. The camera captures the image from behind Ganz's back. He's sitting, a rest-stop. Intercut with more vertiginous shots, of cloudy wisps embracing craggy peaks. The audio shifts in tone (a prime example of mixing moods) to the prelude (or Vorspeil?) to Das Rheingold.

This was as psychedelic as music could be, which included hearing 'Will You Come to the Bower' chanted live. An altered state there are no words for. The lulling, building brass, creates and opens a panorama in your being. Soaring. Gentle intercuts of images of lost, unknown ruins and Herzog has the balls and patience to let the harmonies sustain as you float too among the mountains. If i hadn't heard this piece accompanying a chance channel hop landing, would it ever have revealed the nature of itself as such? Are the fates ever that kind? Who the fuck knows. All i know is that, tucked away in these few minutes, the magic of a hidden truth unveiled itself without even being asked


edit the fuller piece that cuts before screeching singing


A Dad jazz behemoth. Not a Sunday dinner and whiskey jazz tune though. Dark, wintery evening so even the interior walls of the house were cold. If he'd played this before, i hadn't heard it. I knew his usual gear. Brown Rice came on first. The hallway led into the front room and i must've been goofing round, idling. First track of the lp sounded like a train of sorts. Heart-beat tempo, "oooh-oooh-ooooooohs", "browwwn riiiiiice", brass wailing. My attention waned because i can't recall too much, but it's the last song that reared up like a spirit animal and grabbed me by the ears like few other creations have. "Dad, what's THIS?"


Soul flight. Pure and simple. Not to sound pretentious but it really doesn't get much better than this song. The opening bass chords, hypnotic quality of its rolling poly-rhythms, deft key craft and the witch doctor vocals chanting (again) before the brass achieves full lift off. By the time Cherry's first incantation of "from Mali in Affffrica" hits, i was all in. The old man let the music finish and after i promised i'd look after it, he gave me the record to keep for myself.
Mind blown.
 
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WashYourHands

Well-known member
Change of mood. How this arrived is almost impossible to figure except it was possibly via someone at school while stoned (forgive me father for i have sinned). An accumulator. You know those song/tracks that grow on you, but you missed for one reason or from lack of concentration? Psychedelic Shack was popular with a few of my mate's Mums, then my sister played the lp one night getting ready to go out on the piss. I knew the sleeve, i'd just never listened to it properly, attentively and clear-minded. There are so many records from that period that were the remnants of northern soul networks, records handed down from younger adults and older siblings of friends, but if i had to choose my favourite (that isn't even a dance-floor and talc number) it's


That slinky, cat-like tempo is groovetastic, pop pickers. It moves up through the gears sublimely. Sweltering lead guitar work. Church vibes come at you. A pastor of a kind starts up and when he states "here come the good part", you're no longer hanging out of a window sneaking a fag, you're out past the orbit of Saturn, you're swimming 10,000 fathoms down with Poseidon and all the other gods. Who doesn't want a piece of that action.
 

luka

Well-known member
Staff member
I like voices and singing and stuff that's why I've not got into the whites too much. They're not very good at the singing as a rule.
 

luka

Well-known member
Staff member
I like voices and singing and stuff that's why I've not got into the whites too much. They're not very good at the singing as a rule.
Having said that your Irish boys sound alright all those songs you've posted. And Craners taffies are famous for the singing. But not a big part of the popular music industry,
 

IdleRich

IdleRich
The lulling, building brass, creates and opens a panorama in your being. Soaring. Gentle intercuts of images of lost, unknown ruins and Herzog has the balls and patience to let the harmonies sustain as you float too among the mountains.
Did you ever see Heart of Glass... think that's Popol Vuh too and it's maybe his weirdest/most psychedelic film.
 

IdleRich

IdleRich
Yeah I think we discussed it before. I also remember the final(?) scene with them staring out to sea from a kinda rocky rocky cliff promontory - probably with PV playing, which is why I was reminded above.
 

WashYourHands

Well-known member
There too many quality Popol Vuh lp’s, specifically with Herzog soundtrack works.

One particular lp, In Den Garten Pharaos, gets an airing every so often. The 2nd tune, Vuh, has one almighty organ sequence blended with choral nuances that‘s simply majestic


Tune in question starts around the 18min mark.
 
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pattycakes_

Well-known member
My favourite thing by them is a little theme that keeps popping up in Aguirre which is just a couple of cello notes with (maybe) some swirling pad or voice, can't even remember now, throughout the film in the quieter moments. Isn't on the released OST unfortunately. Such a stirring passage though
 

WashYourHands

Well-known member
Off the same lp, a monster of alien grooves


The way Kirk uses and works in that electro-squirrel riff is the hallmark of a master. It's too smooth to be squeaky, but it remains unnerving and head-noddy at the same time even today, a whole 26years later.
 
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