Etymology

Simon silverdollarcircle

Well-known member
The ancient roots of the word alcohol are good reading:

The etymology shows that Akkadian guhlu is a loanword from Sumerian, where it evolved through vowel harmony from the Sumerian term for 'evil-eye' into our word 'kohl'. Furthermore, according to Stephan Guth, Professor of Arabic at the University of Oslo, our word 'alcohol' "is derived from the Arabic al-kuhl, which means 'kohl'
 

sufi

lala
what do you mean? what am i looking at here?
those are the actual pages from the actual book that Prynne was on about in your quote- original Pokorny in German, & translated version on archive.org.
Not the easiest read, even in English, but there's definitely something magic about that type of schematic book, lots of juicy clever stuff needed decyphering, like an exploded text, but a whole exploded language, and depending on how you recombine t back together and entre cultural corpus all inside a dusty hardback
 

sufi

lala
The ancient roots of the word alcohol are good reading:

The etymology shows that Akkadian guhlu is a loanword from Sumerian, where it evolved through vowel harmony from the Sumerian term for 'evil-eye' into our word 'kohl'. Furthermore, according to Stephan Guth, Professor of Arabic at the University of Oslo, our word 'alcohol' "is derived from the Arabic al-kuhl, which means 'kohl'
Kohl is eyeshadow, good protection against dispensing or receiving the evil eye https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kohl_(cosmetics)
 

luka

Well-known member
Staff member
yeah i know. i just meant where is the bit about him ignoring Anatolian?
 

luka

Well-known member
Staff member
oh well. i cant say that bothers me much. im never interested in whatever is currently construed as 'the facts'.
 

luka

Well-known member
Staff member
in fact i have an innate hostility towards whatever is currently construed as the facts. make everything up.
 

Mr. Tea

Shub-Niggurath, Please
Staff member
'Quarantine' is a good one, that loads of people have become aware of this year, in some cases through personal experience.
 

constant escape

winter withered, warm
gender

c. 1300, "kind, sort, class, a class or kind of persons or things sharing certain traits," from Old French gendre, genre "kind, species; character; gender" (12c., Modern French genre), from stem of Latin genus (genitive generis) "race, stock, family; kind, rank, order; species," also "(male or female) sex," from PIE root *gene- "give birth, beget," with derivatives referring to procreation and familial and tribal groups.
 

constant escape

winter withered, warm
Wondering if entering adulthood has any semantic/etymological connections with losing innocence, passing some sexual threshold.

adult (adj.)1530s (but not common until mid-17c.) "grown, mature," from Latin adultus "grown up, mature, adult, ripe," past participle of adolescere "grow up, come to maturity, ripen," from ad "to" (see ad-) + alescere "be nourished," hence, "increase, grow up," inchoative of alere "to nourish," from a suffixed form of PIE root *al- (2) "to grow, nourish."

Meaning "mature in attitude or outlook" is from 1929. As a euphemism for "pornographic," it dates to 1958 and does no honor to the word. In the old British film-rating system, A indicated "suitable for exhibit to adult audiences," and thus, implicitly, unsuitable for children (1914).[/adult]
 

Mr. Tea

Shub-Niggurath, Please
Staff member
Wondering if entering adulthood has any semantic/etymological connections with losing innocence, passing some sexual threshold.
The American pronunciation, with emphasis on the second syllable, always makes me think of the word "adultery".
 

constant escape

winter withered, warm
Which would indicate a negative meaning, no? Something being taken away, something being lost - but perhaps in a ritualistic way. Becoming an adult, phase shift.
 

constant escape

winter withered, warm
From etymonline.com

bigot (n.)

1590s, "sanctimonious person, religious hypocrite," from French bigot (12c.), which is of unknown origin. Sense extended 1680s to other than religious opinions.

Earliest French use of the word is as the name of a people apparently in southern Gaul, which led to the theory, now considered doubtful on phonetic grounds, that the word comes from Visigothus. The typical use in Old French seems to have been as a derogatory nickname for Normans, leading to another theory (not universally accepted) that traces it to the Normans' (alleged) frequent use of the Germanic oath bi God. OED dismisses in a three-exclamation-mark fury one fanciful version of the "by god" theory as "absurdly incongruous with facts." At the end, not much is left standing except Spanish bigote "mustache," which also has been proposed as the origin of the word, but not explained, so the chief virtue of that theory is the lack of evidence for or against it.

In support of the "by God" theory the surnames Bigott, Bygott are attested in Normandy and in England from the 11c., and French name-etymology sources (such as Dauzat) explain it as a derogatory name applied by the French to the Normans and representing "by god." The English were known as goddamns 200 years later in Joan of Arc's France, and during World War I Americans serving in France were said to be known as les sommobiches (see son of a bitch) for their characteristic oaths. But the sense development in bigot would be difficult to explain. According to Donkin, the modern use first appears in French in 16c. This and the earliest English sense, "religious hypocrite," especially a female one, might have been influenced by or confused with beguine (q.v.) and the words that cluster around it.
 
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