Lockdown 2.0

luka

Well-known member
Staff member
I hope not. I can't imagine they want to do it. But I agree it will be more depressing doing it in the winter.
 

version

Who loves ya, baby?
It's getting to the point where I'm struggling to imagine any other world. Forgetting what it was like to be able to go out and do stuff. Pandemic Realism.
 

luka

Well-known member
Staff member
I'm fairly sick of it too. The masks and the low level anxiety. The interminable nature of the thing. No light at the end of the tunnel
 

Linebaugh

Well-known member
I barely can tell the difference over here tbh. Everything runs as normal, just a few extra steps involved.
 

version

Who loves ya, baby?
Having to consider who's touched the packaging of whatever you're about to eat. Who's touched the door handle you're about to use.
 

version

Who loves ya, baby?
I feel this is as applicable to coronavirus as it is to the ongoing protest movements,

... the American future lies in the routing of all available definitions of freedom through the ever-narrowing channel of security. His is a magisterial vision of a republic fashioned, top to bottom, on the model of a never-ending war waged against elements internal to the nation. Given the provenance of so many of these tactics in scenes of imperial conflict—from Southeast Asia to Latin America to the Middle East—you could do worse than to think of this as a dream of perpetual counterinsurgency, brought back to what we have for some time now been calling the Homeland. That dream nourishes itself even now—as surely you know—in places such as Portland, Louisville, Minneapolis, and Kenosha.
 

luka

Well-known member
Staff member
There's no cases in lots of England, as far as I know, eg Doncaster.
 

luka

Well-known member
Staff member
the anxiety is not even particularly low level if you ask me
I've found it containable for the most part. Couple of wobbly moments during lockdown. But I'd rather it disappeared entirely
 

version

Who loves ya, baby?
But read it today, in the midst of our own fever dream of penal sociality, and you are liable to be taken aback by the clarity of its insistence that a style of carceral fanaticism—a making over of everyday life into the image of perpetual security crisis—is no less a signature of the thing we call neoliberalism than are manic privatization, oligarchic dominion, and the total absorption of public life into market imperatives.
 

version

Who loves ya, baby?
I found just how quickly masks became merchandise for musicians etc completely horrifying and still do.
 

luka

Well-known member
Staff member
I do feel sorry for all the young people who've had their dreams cancelled. Like, let's imagine, for example, a desperately poor coal miners daughter from a poor country who worked as a child prostitute to get through night school and won a scholarship to Havard and now she can't take it up cos of coronavirus.

There must be millions of similar really sad stories.
 

Linebaugh

Well-known member
Not that the virus hasn't left its mark, but if I was inclined I could live in a way almost indistinguishable from pre covid times. I have some friends on social that are going out to packed bars every weekend.
 

version

Who loves ya, baby?
I could be well into my 30s by the time things start getting back to normal, if they ever do. Scary thought.
 
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