Heidegger

luka

Well-known member
Staff member
This is a thread for Washyourhands to tell us all about Heidegger. We all know he's a Nazi so no need to rehash that stuff. Let's stick to the prevailing vision, what he saw and tried and to impart to us.
 

Corpsey

call me big papa
You've been mentioning Heidegger a lot lately. What is it that attracts you to his philosophy?
 

luka

Well-known member
Staff member
Primarily his sense of being and foregrounding of being. To dwell within that light.
 

Corpsey

call me big papa
(Sorry for repeating myself...) I was attracted to his philosophy as an undergraduate. And now I can't remember why, because I can't remember the philosophy. It may have simply been a charismatic lecturer (who - because nobody else turned up - I had two one-on-one seminars on Heidegger with).

I wrote an essay comparing Wittgenstein and Heidegger. I can't remember the substance of this essay but my conclusion (who knows how valid) was that later Wittgenstein resembled earlier Heidegger and vice versa.
 

Corpsey

call me big papa
Just read a bit of the wiki and it jogged my memory re: our apprehension of the utility of objects and not the objects themselves.

Its really foggy now but I remember the lecturer drawing my attention to the table in front of me and questioning what Being it had for me/us.

It made my head heart I think, and it felt like I was expanding my consciousness.
 

luka

Well-known member
Staff member
The other thing which attracts me is that Heidegger correctly puts poets before philosophers. Philosophers are dependent on poets and follow in their wake.
 

Corpsey

call me big papa
Primarily his sense of being and foregrounding of being. To dwell within that light.
As you perhaps imply here, Heidegger was more attractive to me than other continental philosophers because he seemed to be grappling with the biggest questions (at least as far as I was concerned).

Poetic questions, you might say.

I think Heidegger is a philosopher that might appeal more to Literature students/practitioners than other philosophers.
 

luka

Well-known member
Staff member
As you perhaps imply here, Heidegger was more attractive to me than other continental philosophers because he seemed to be grappling with the biggest questions (at least as far as I was concerned).

Poetic questions, you might say.

I think Heidegger is a philosopher that might appeal more to Literature students/practitioners than other philosophers.
And it makes it less abstract. You start with something real, not with an idea.
 

thirdform

Well-known member
The other thing which attracts me is that Heidegger correctly puts poets before philosophers. Philosophers are dependent on poets and follow in their wake.
except the modern poet is dependent on the bank account in a way the ancient poet was not.
 

luka

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Staff member
It returns you to that eternal morning time that psychedelics place you right in the centre of
 

luka

Well-known member
Staff member
I think we all are now in no doubt about what we already knew, ie, that thirdform thinks Heidegger is 'rubbish.' An important contribution which has led to an interesting and engaging conversation, but one which is now over.
 

thirdform

Well-known member
I think we all are now in no doubt about what we already knew, ie, that thirdform thinks Heidegger is 'rubbish.' An important contribution which has led to an interesting and engaging conversation, but one which is now over.
I mean Edmond Burke is more interesting as reactionaries go. At least he centres the sublime, which Heidegger is too besotted to early 20th century German academia to do.
 
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