English gardens

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the new landscape designs made even more decisive breaks with continental gardening than did Pope at Twickenham. Gone were the intricate Italian knot motifs and razor-straight French avenues. Instead, designers opted for sinuous paths, expressed a newfound reliance upon trees, and built a succession of architectural novelties.

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NY's Central Park is famously English in design. You can get very legitimately lost in the North Woods; it's full of circuitous routes around reservoirs and baseball diamonds and lagoons. Compare Riverside Park, along the Upper West Side—those crisp French avenues that parallel FDR Drive.
 

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Pope even had a massive grotto dug on his property, to go along/bring to life the images of his poetry

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ruinlust
 

jenks

thread death
I think part of this connected to both the reaction to anything too 'continental' particularly anything that might smack of foreign catholic influences but also a much later adoption of Romanticism as a movement. Burke's earlier ideas of the sublime play a large part in there too.
Roy Strong writes well on the English garden and there is an interesting chapter in Romantic Moderns which looks at garden revivals in the thirties - Jekyll and all that lot - Sissinghurst etc. It's the kind of thing my wife knows loads about. I remember a scouse mate of mine claiming that Central Park was based on a park in Birkenhead - i don't know true that might be.
 

craner

Beast of Burden
My aunt is an expert on Gertrude Jekyll gardens. In fact, she lives in a house with one.
 

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I think part of this connected to both the reaction to anything too 'continental' particularly anything that might smack of foreign catholic influences but also a much later adoption of Romanticism as a movement. Burke's earlier ideas of the sublime play a large part in there too.
Roy Strong writes well on the English garden and there is an interesting chapter in Romantic Moderns which looks at garden revivals in the thirties - Jekyll and all that lot - Sissinghurst etc. It's the kind of thing my wife knows loads about. I remember a scouse mate of mine claiming that Central Park was based on a park in Birkenhead - i don't know true that might be.

Yes, that's what I've read, that there was a strong strain of self-congratulatory anti-Catholicism. (Mixed with a fair amount of sincere nostalgia—Pope was a Catholic, for instance, and had designs sponsored by a Catholic patron.)

I think you're right on Birkenhead—Olmstead, the landscape architect who designed it, did a trip there & adored it.
 

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no trees anywhere. not a single tree. just hedgerows and fields, hedgerows and fields. no pavements either so you're always in danger of being flattened by a tractor driver drunk at 6am on a Tuesday

Is it true??
 

luka

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What you have to understand is this is a very very small very very densely populated island and it's been inhabited for a very long time. What countryside there is is literally just dirt factories. which is why there are far more birds in cities than in the countryside where the land is blighted with insecticides and there are no trees to roost in
 
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