English gardens

luka

Well-known member
dales_stonewalls.jpg

Britain is a desert landscape essentially.
 

suspended

Well-known member
Birkenhead park was the first park to be established at public expense in the United Kingdom. Prior to Birkenhead all parks had been created by private individuals or private organisations and access was held privately, although it could be given to the public. Birkenhead park was influential on the design of public parks both in the UK and internationally and it is considered a landmark in the history of public parks.[6]
 

luka

Well-known member
I dont think i really noticed it until I'd lived in countries that do still have trees. Then you come back and realise the land is naked and barren.
 

WashYourHands

Well-known member
There are Forests, but wilderness not really


D8NVF_yXUAAVp6L.jpg


2 stars = 2 European Cups. Apologies, had to get that in.

Britain goes for areas of outstanding natural beauty, which are essentially big fuck off gardens


AONBSUK.png


Scotland gets the rough end of things as usual.
 

Mr. Tea

Shub-Niggurath, Please

Recalls the George Monbiot ranticle that the Guardian published a few years ago, that said "Go for a walk in the British countryside, and what do you see? Sheep, sheep and more bloody sheep." He's got a point.
No one's bothered re-planting?!
There are some plantation forests - much more than there are ancient forests, actually - but they're often planted with non-native pine trees. They can be spooky as fuck, because they're dead silent due to the absence of birds. In some of them the trees are even planted on a regular grid pattern.
 
Last edited:

Mr. Tea

Shub-Niggurath, Please
Don't let Gus fool you, everyone. I've been in California in the summer, and it isn't "a bit like" a desert. It is a desert.
 

IdleRich

IdleRich
It's certainly true that there are quite a lot of green spaces inside towns - definitely in Portugal (at least in Lisbon and the surrounding villages) I often feel that there is greenery missing from the streets, big spaces that really ought to have trees in them... you know, the centres of streets and so on, but they just... don't.
 

pattycakes_

Well-known member
Recalls the George Monbiot ranticle that the Guardian published a few years ago, that said "Go for a walk in the British countryside, and what do you see? Sheep, sheep and more bloody sheep." He's got a point.

There are some plantation forests - much more than there are ancient forests, actually - but they're often planted with non-native pine trees. They can be spooky as fuck, because they're dead silent due to the absence of birds. In some of them the trees are even planted on a regular grid pattern.

those planted forests are weird for sure. loads of them here in germany too.

luckily along with the sheep, where i grew up had a few trees too

32226712-8651969-image-a-6_1598038089750.jpg


csm_England_Lake_District_touristik_aktuell_18769fd5b6.jpg


Ullswater.jpg


hard not to be inspired by it all. certainly didn't do wordsworth any harm. or taylor swift for that matter

 

IdleRich

IdleRich
You mean the garbage guy's mansion?
Indeed... with the feature I referred to as a pergola.
Actually, googling it, it appears that I was correct
A pergola is an outdoor garden feature forming a shaded walkway, passageway, or sitting area of vertical posts or pillars that usually support cross-beams and a sturdy open lattice, often upon which woody vines are trained.The origin of the word is the Late Latin pergula, referring to a projecting eave. As a type of gazebo, it may also be an extension of a building or serve as protection for an open terrace or a link between pavilions. They are different from green tunnels, with a green tunnel being a type of road under a canopy of trees.

There is a nice one in Hampstead Heath I recall

Hampstead-Pergola-10.jpg


We intend to pay another visit to the Palacio do Rei do Lixo soon with a few intrigued friends. A night time visit might be fun but somehow I doubt we will dare that... well, the others might but I won't.
 

suspended

Well-known member
Don't let Gus fool you, everyone. I've been in California in the summer, and it isn't "a bit like" a desert. It is a desert.

that's SoCal, don't get Central and NorCal confused!

1606339094347.jpeg

We actually have been in a decade-long drought in the Central Coast, I won't lie. It's meadows and oak, really big, beautiful silvery oak.
 

boxedjoy

Well-known member
I once did a coach journey through Italy via France and Switzerland and the landscape in the hills was stunning, I remember being shocked by how many trees there were, right beside the roads too. In Scotland you can see forests but their right up in the hills, miles away from the roads and railway lines.
 
Top