catalog

Well-known member
 

WashYourHands

Well-known member
This entertaining yarn cropped up in the timeline today, an intriguing tangle of dna based confusion
i really like this scheme of checking for isotopes, it seems like even deeper trace meta data is available than mere dna, and makes me expect that we can get deeper and deeper still, tracking the very vibrational frequencies into scientifical quantities
like the soul in every inanimate object

That’s a strange tale indeed. The Armenian angle is tantalising - proximity, trade, networks. But Greeks? It reminds me a bit about a tale from the US Civil War, where a battle was fought at a site where a previous action had taken place. When both sides began to dig in and form trenches, they found masses of union and confederate skeletal remains. Then the battle started.

I tell the kids that one late at night by the fireside (jokes).
 

sufi

lala
That’s a strange tale indeed. The Armenian angle is tantalising - proximity, trade, networks. But Greeks? It reminds me a bit about a tale from the US Civil War, where a battle was fought at a site where a previous action had taken place. When both sides began to dig in and form trenches, they found masses of union and confederate skeletal remains. Then the battle started.

I tell the kids that one late at night by the fireside (jokes).
https://www.livehistoryindia.com/history-daily/2020/01/24/the-other-greeks-who-invaded-india wrong timeline, but it does sound like they need to revisit that lake and get some better samples
 

WashYourHands

Well-known member
From memory, the aryan invasion of India is evidenced by the use of fire (aryan) and water (Dravidian) in funerary rites. This was pretty much the standard interpretation at uni of aryan migration eastwards, except we couldn’t apply it to Gimbutas or Bronze Age invasions from the Steppe westward, completely verboten


2A01C0F9-1990-4800-A178-614A374CD07C.jpeg

India has such a vast genetic range of influences. If the DNA and C14 data correlated we’d have an answer, but the rates of genetic change and continuation have been consistent and complex.

Scuse the detour away from herbal remedies, but find human migrations endlessly intriguing and the Himalayas case study was certainly new to me.
 

luka

Well-known member
Staff member
This stuff is absolutely massive in YouTube comment boxes. All fuel for frothing nationalism and race hate.
 

luka

Well-known member
Staff member
There's a good essay in the Wordsworth classics edition of Finnegans Wake by Len Platt...

"Throughout The Wake there is a fascination with particular essential and essentialist questions, thus the obsession with genealogy and lineage, which derives from the fundamental concern with origins to produce a thoroughgoing and hilarious subversion of the family tree, 'the book of breedings' that the wake struggles to be.... a broadly ethnographic discourse tries unsuccessfully to trace the origins of HCE's name 'in the presurnames prodromarith period' and insists there will be a 'discarding once for all those theories from older sources which would link him back with pivotal ancestors as the Glues, the Gravys, the Northeasts, the Ankers and the Earwickers.' There is a closely associated frame of reference around race identity and classification and the attempt to sort out the ethnographical confusions of such bizarre designations as 'Hispano-Catayan-Euxine, Castilian-Emeratic-Hebridian, Espanol-Cymric-Helleniky.'
 

WashYourHands

Well-known member
What Joyce was exposed to was the first initial academic exploration of migration through cultural typologies, which is still ongoing, yet he had the grace to play with it all and riff on mystery.
 

sufi

lala
From memory, the aryan invasion of India is evidenced by the use of fire (aryan) and water (Dravidian) in funerary rites. This was pretty much the standard interpretation at uni of aryan migration eastwards, except we couldn’t apply it to Gimbutas or Bronze Age invasions from the Steppe westward, completely verboten


View attachment 5353

India has such a vast genetic range of influences. If the DNA and C14 data correlated we’d have an answer, but the rates of genetic change and continuation have been consistent and complex.

Scuse the detour away from herbal remedies, but find human migrations endlessly intriguing and the Himalayas case study was certainly new to me.
Somewhere or other there's an account of Alexander the Great's lads turning up in Sind and finding remains of already ancient cities down there on the Indus delta. I visited some of them and some Alexander sites further north up towards the big mountains, amongst squatted temples and long abandoned buddhist remains scattered around PK

those contacts don't really make it into the western historical canon - i suppose that geographically they are obscure to europe, but also culturally we have this fixation about the greeks and romans being our culture progenitors, and so linking them to south cultures is hard for us to take, despite the parallels between the greek and hindu pantheons (i think - duno much about that but it makes sense).
 

sufi

lala
Bringin this back towards herbal remedies: i don't think "science" has a better handle on why the ingredients of Chyawanaprash make you potent any more than who those chaps in the lake were, or what HCE stands for, and yet those truths are out there still
... that's what this thread is all about, or...?
 

catalog

Well-known member
I used to love the chavanprash adverts when I was a kid


He was a skinny little lad as a kid, but then...

The other good advert was for hajmola, but they are really fucking rough ugh

 
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