The Eagle vs The Serpent

luka

Well-known member
Staff member
we saw how the Messianic succession of Grail dynasts (or Dragon Kings) was alchemically conceived and purpose-bred for the role of earthly leadership. We looked at the records of ancient Sumer, which talked of the Anunnaki gods and their "creation chamber".
 

pattycakes_

Well-known member


Holy Roman Empire:





You know who:

This and many of them still stand around Berlin:




Countries With Eagles On Their Flags


Flags of several countries feature an eagle on their design.

The eagle is considered by many as the king of the skies. It has sharp talons, excellent eyesight, and immense strength, which has made it a very successful predator in the air. For this reason, the eagle has been used on state and organization flags to represent courage, power, and freedom. Several nations have the eagle represented in their flags.

Albania

The Albanian flag is red with a black silhouette of a double-headed eagle placed at the center. The eagle represents the sovereignty of the state of Albania while the red color symbolizes bravery, strength, and freedom. The double-headed eagle is an element they borrowed from the Byzantine Empire. It was adopted by the noble families of Albania until 1912 when it became the official state flag.

Ecuador

The flag of Ecuador has three horizontal bands, and the yellow band at the top is twice the size of the blue and red bands at the bottom. At the center of the flag is the coat of arms which consists of an oval shield with a picture of a mountain, a river with a steamboat, and an eagle standing at the top of them. The current flag was adopted in 1860 with some design changes in 1900.

Mexico

The Mexican flag is a simple tricolor of red, white, and green vertical stripes with a coat of arms in the center of the white band. Within the coat of arms stands an eagle holding a snake with its beak, the eagle is perched over a cactus plant surrounded by a semi-circle of laurel leaves at the bottom. The current flag was officially adopted in 1968.

Serbia

The Serbian flag has three horizontal bands of red, blue, and white from top to bottom. On the hoist side of the flag sits the coat of arms that consists of a golden crown and a double-headed white eagle. The flag has been used officially by the Serbian state for two centuries now, and the current design was adopted in 2010.

Moldova

The flag is made of 3 vertical bands of red, yellow, and blue. At the center of the flag sits the state’s coat of arms made of a golden eagle with a red and blue shield on its chest. The eagle on the coat of arms is also holding an Orthodox Christian cross in its beak, an olive branch on its right claw and a golden mace on its left. Moldova has been using the flag since 1990

Egypt

The Egyptian flag is made of three horizontal bands of red, white, and black from top to bottom. At the center, there is the golden eagle of Saladin. The red, white, and black stripes represent the Egyptian revolution of 1952 that brought independence to the country.

Kazakhstan

The flag of Kazakhstan is bright blue with a golden sun with 32 rays in the middle shining over a golden steppe eagle that has its wings spread out in flight mode. The flag was officially adopted in 1992 after Kazakhstan changed from the Kazakh Soviet Socialist Republic.

Other Countries

Other countries that bear the eagle symbol on their flags include American Samoa which has an eagle on the fly side. There is also the flag of Montenegro which has a double-headed eagle and lastly there is United States Virgin Islands whose flag has a golden eagle holding arrows and an olive branch




Mexican one is interesting because right there you have the eagle and the serpent together, with the eagle clearly 'beating' the serpent. Some people say the serpent represents Pagan culture, especially because so many Pagans from around the world worshipped the serpent (serpent symbols can be found everywhere) for it's evolutionary characteristic shedding of it's skin to grow into a bigger and better serpent. So they were not celebrating snakes themselves, but the idea of growing and becoming better. They say the Mexican flag had this emblem added to represent the final running out of the last outposts of "pagan" culture in the late 60s, right around the time the west was catching on to Peyote and psychedelics as a route to evolving (skin shedding: evolution)









It seems as though many of the more domineering cultures throughoput history adopted the Eagle as their symbol because it represented not only power but it's also one of the higher flying and better sighted birds, so you have the overseeing aspect too. In short you could say it's a symbol of control and conquest.
 

catalog

Well-known member
Following on from the Eagle vs Snakes one posted by Patty...

Garuda in Hindu mythology, he is half bird, half man and becomes Vishnu's chariot/ride after defeating some snakes who are guarding the nectar of immortality... He has to get the pot to give to some other snakes, but Vishnu persuades him to not give it to them.

Good story.

I'm not sure if he's an Eagle tho.



There's some great depictions





 

suspended

Well-known member
Mexican one is interesting because right there you have the eagle and the serpent together, with the eagle clearly 'beating' the serpent. Some people say the serpent represents Pagan culture, especially because so many Pagans from around the world worshipped the serpent (serpent symbols can be found everywhere) for it's evolutionary characteristic shedding of it's skin to grow into a bigger and better serpent. So they were not celebrating snakes themselves, but the idea of growing and becoming better. They say the Mexican flag had this emblem added to represent the final running out of the last outposts of "pagan" culture in the late 60s, right around the time the west was catching on to Peyote and psychedelics as a route to evolving (skin shedding: evolution)
Good post but where on earth did you hear this story about paganism and the 60s

That's been the Mexican coat of arms for two hundred years and predates it as a symbol by like a millennium. Ancient Tenochitlan symbol mythically tied to it's founding. They saw an eagle on a cactus eating a serpent, took it as a sign, and settled. (so the myth goes)
 

luka

Well-known member
Staff member
Isn't the eagle often with two heads, a kind of Romanov related symbol?
Good question. From what I can remember, and my history is a little rusty, in heraldry and vexillology, the double-headed eagle (or double-eagle) is a charge associated with the concept of Empire. Most modern uses of the symbol are directly or indirectly associated with its use by the Byzantine Empire, whose use of it represented the Empire's dominion over the Near East and the West. The symbol is much older, and its original meaning is debated among scholars. The eagle has long been a symbol of power and dominion.

The double-headed eagle or double-eagle is a motif that appears in Mycenaean Greece and in the Ancient Near East, especially in Hittite iconography. It re-appeared during the High Middle Ages, from around the 10th or 11th centuries, and was notably used by the Byzantine Empire, but 11th or 12th century representations have also been found originating from Islamic Spain, France and the Serbian principality of Raška. From the 13th century onward, it became even more widespread, and was used by the Seljuk Sultanate of Rum and the Mamluk Sultanate within the Islamic world, and within the Christian world by the Holy Roman Empire, Serbia, several medieval Albanian noble families and Russia.

Used in the Byzantine Empire as a dynastic emblem of the Palaiologoi, it was adopted during the Late Medieval to Early Modern period in the Holy Roman Empire on the one hand, and in Orthodox principalities (Serbia and Russia) on the other, representing an augmentation of the (single-headed) eagle or Aquila associated with the Roman Empire. In a few places, among them the Holy Roman Empire and Russia, the motif was further augmented to create the less prominent triple-headed eagle.
 

DLaurent

Well-known member
Ah just saw posts above where it was already mentioned.
I like the Romanov story though and the Death of Rasputin and all that stuff but they obviously nicked the logo from the Byzantines and earlier.

There's a story in Greek Mythology about a guy who would be released if he managed to draw a perfectly straight line, but the name escapes me. The reason I mention it, there was a thing called Serpentine Lines as described by Hogarth.

 

IdleRich

IdleRich
It seems as though many of the more domineering cultures throughoput history adopted the Eagle as their symbol because it represented not only power but it's also one of the higher flying and better sighted birds, so you have the overseeing aspect too. In short you could say it's a symbol of control and conquest.
Golden eagle is now believed to be the actual fastest flying bird I think, as they now think that when it dives it actually achieves higher speeds than a peregrine falcon which was previously thought to be the fastest. More than 200 mph apparently.
 

pattycakes_

Well-known member
Good post but where on earth did you hear this story about paganism and the 60s

That's been the Mexican coat of arms for two hundred years and predates it as a symbol by like a millennium. Ancient Tenochitlan symbol mythically tied to it's founding. They saw an eagle on a cactus eating a serpent, took it as a sign, and settled. (so the myth goes)


Says right there it was adopted in 68
 

pattycakes_

Well-known member
An interesting thing to look at is how the serpent has become the symbol of evil and the eagle the symbol of freedom. The classic trick, twisting it upside down as 'they' tend to do, looking at the church and its manipulation of so many pagan festivals and symbols for eg
 
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IdleRich

IdleRich
Ah just saw posts above where it was already mentioned.
I like the Romanov story though and the Death of Rasputin and all that stuff but they obviously nicked the logo from the Byzantines and earlier.

There's a story in Greek Mythology about a guy who would be released if he managed to draw a perfectly straight line, but the name escapes me. The reason I mention it, there was a thing called Serpentine Lines as described by Hogarth.

I think it was Giotto whose submission to gain entry to the academy or whatever was a perfect circle drawn by hand.
 
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