Russia: PURE EVIL.

luka

Well-known member
i just thought it better to have a thread for it cos the Curtis thread was getting a bit bogged down
 

suspended

Well-known member
In a statement issued Wednesday, Amnesty said referring to Navalny that it would "continue to fight for his freedom," but that the organization had "taken an internal decision to stop referring to Aleksei Navalny as a prisoner of conscience in relation to comments he made in the past."

"Some of these comments, which Navalny has not publicly denounced, reach the threshold of advocacy of hatred, and this is at odds with Amnesty's definition of a prisoner of conscience," the statement said.

Asked by NPR to provide specifics about the "past comments" the organization referred to, Amnesty declined.

Speaking to NPR's Weekend Edition in January, Julia Davis, a Russian media and disinformation expert, said Navalny "still has nationalist leanings" and among other things, supported Russia's 2014 annexation of Crimea, which was widely condemned internationally.

"No one could say that he is in perfect alignment with all of the Western values," Davis told host Scott Simon. "But there again, that's not what he aims to represent. What he mainly represents is the possibility that the Russians might be the ones to decide who gets to lead Russia."
 

suspended

Well-known member
I liked Russia when I visited but they put meat in everything! It's like a post-scarcity famine mindset thing! You go bite into a loaf of bread, it's stuffed with ham! You go to eat a spinach wrap, ham! Luka you would hate it
 

luka

Well-known member
I liked Russia when I visited but they put meat in everything! It's like a post-scarcity famine mindset thing! You go bite into a loaf of bread, it's stuffed with ham! You go to eat a spinach wrap, ham! Luka you would hate it
what took you there? curiosity?
 

suspended

Well-known member
what took you there? curiosity?
Yes I went twice. The second time was because I had a lay-over from Istanbul before passing over the Arctic Circle, I just took a car into the city and spent a day wandering the catacombs with a friend of mine, Alexey. The first time I went for a few weeks with friends, to Moscow and St. Petersburg. It took weeks of paperwork to get a visa, quite the nightmare, well worth it.

Now that I think of it, I'm not sure why they let me into Moscow without a visa, the second time.
 

DannyL

Wild Horses
rts21738_wide-aede4e87f3b3ba01e9268cdccab2977c82487e50-s1100.jpg
 

Mr. Tea

Shub-Niggurath, Please
I remember when Alexander Litvinenko was poisoned with polonium, and they were trying to treat him in UCH, which I'd walk past on my way to UCL where I was studying at the time. There was always a police presence outside the hospital and I think there may have been some sort of radiological protection people there too at some point, since the patient himself was a potential hazard to the doctors and nurses treating him.

It struck me at the time that this such a Bond-villain-esque way to bump someone off. Just so unnecessarily theatrical. But what a way to send a message.
 

DannyL

Wild Horses
Journalists in Russia seem very accident prone as well:
In March 2007, Ivan Safronov, who was investigating the sale of Russian arms to Iran and Syria, died after falling from a fifth-floor window. It was ruled a suicide.
In November 2009, independent broadcaster Olga Kotovskaya fell to her death from a 14th-floor window. She had been battling for control of her station with a member of the government. Her death was also ruled a suicide.
In February 2012, Victor Aphanasenko, editor of a newspaper that had been investigating paramilitary raids in southern Russia, died after slipping in his home.
In November 2015, Mikhail Lesin, who was often described as President Vladimir Putin's state media czar but who had fallen out of favor with him, was found dead after a fall in his hotel room in Washington, D.C. The FBI says he fell from extreme drinking and had "blunt force trauma to the head" and injuries to his neck, arms, legs and torso. That must have been some fall.
In March 2017, Nikolai Gorokhov, the lawyer for Sergei Magnitsky, who was the source of reporting on Russia's largest tax fraud, fell from a fourth-story window while trying to move a bathtub. Russian authorities made that explanation with a straight face.
 

luka

Well-known member
Top