google street view

luka

Well-known member
but you can then isolate and frame images from within that stream. which is what photography does withe the world.
 

Corpsey

call me big papa
probably too inadvertently arty for this thread

R4oMCHe.png
 

luka

Well-known member
the interesting thing that is captured there is the specific type of ugliness and banality exhibited in the shop fronts, the greggs in particular a particular trend of design which presumably aims at legibility over style. the scores on the ITV football coverage in the corner of the screen were the same. hideous colours and font.
 

luka

Well-known member
one of the things i like about the patrick keiller films is that they ask what i england made of
if you peel back the images we have of it, good and bad, and the stories we tell ourselves about it
what is it actually made of.
 

luka

Well-known member
have you used the timeline feature? that's quite good.
what is it? not heard of it. i was wondering what they do with all the superceded footage. there muct be an enormous amount and it would be extremenly useful and interesting for research purposes/idle curiosity. do they burn it or keep it and can you access it
 

luka

Well-known member
its always unnerving to find you cant remember what was in the place of the new building thats just materialised out of thin air. you cant find your way back to what was in its place a week ago.
 

catalog

Well-known member
"When you're in Street View mode in Google Maps, if a clock icon is displayed under the address at the top-left of the map then historical street view imagery is available there. Click down arrow under the clock to expand the dates when imagery is available. You can click the different dates on the timeline to preview the imagery.

Try visiting a location that is known to have historical street view imagery. For example, visit Google's home campus (1600 Amphitheatre Pkwy, Mountain View, CA 94043). Next open street view then you'll see the clock icon under the address showing dates for historical street view imagery."
 

luka

Well-known member
the interesting thing that is captured there is the specific type of ugliness and banality exhibited in the shop fronts, the greggs in particular a particular trend of design which presumably aims at legibility over style. the scores on the ITV football coverage in the corner of the screen were the same. hideous colours and font.
what makes it more upsetting and strange is that this sort of thing was quite sophisticated at one stage. there has been a regression into barbarity and i dont totally know why
 

luka

Well-known member
looking, like reading, or listening etc is an active operation not a passive one and you have to keep reminding yourself of this even if its with fairly artificial exercises.
 

Corpsey

call me big papa
I find looking the hardest thing to do at an art gallery.

At one pole you walk around not the gallery totally uninterested in it all, and so never take a moment to stop and look at anything.

At the other pole you've read enough about art history to make you stop and look at things more patiently, but your head is so full of history and polemics that you can't really look at anything without seeking to categorise it.

Does this make sense?

This is why I find smoking weed almost a compulsory part of going to a gallery. Sometimes it makes me over thoughtful but often it helps me see things so vividly that I don't need the analytic crutch to direct my eyes/enjoyment...
 

Corpsey

call me big papa
Seeing and looking are different, of course, as are hearing and listening.

It's rare that I actually LISTEN to music. And again, there's a danger that in LISTENING to music you end up out of focus. It's either too great or too little distance. There's a balance that sometimes is hard to find.
 

luka

Well-known member
it's all hard and youre also dependent to some degree, i would say, on some kind of grace, in the religious sense, which is what you are smoking weed to access.
 

Corpsey

call me big papa
Once something is assimilated/locked into a category in your mind it becomes hard to see it as anything other than something belonging to that category. The purpose of realistic art (one purpose anyway) is to alert the viewer to the singularity of even the most seemingly mundane table or apple or whatever. But art itself is a category in your head, so that very quickly it becomes difficult to even see a painting without seeing just "a painting".

Why am I so thick?
 

WashYourHands

Well-known member
the bins are what makes this work

sexy bins

i did this with Rotherhithe early in lockdown trying to get a look at the places my folks first shared when they met. Didn’t think to take an image or 12

The good ones capture the liminal, existential, occulted slices of reality’s totality
 
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