google street view

Corpsey

call me big papa
Looks crap

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This might be another sidebar but I've really become aware in recent years of how shit a lot of things look when photographed – because the camera takes a picture of what's "really" there, whereas the human eye is constantly focusing on things nad making them look bigger and more vivid. Obvious example would be taking a picture of a landscape and the hills that occupy most of your vision look tiny and shit in the photograph. Realised how we still need painting to capture what we see, which is better than what's really there.
 

Corpsey

call me big papa
Looks crap

EKpY45Y.png

Actually this is interesting cos I think the photos luka posted look strangely "true to life" and this doesn't – and perhaps that's cos those scenes luka posted are so mundane that we really do see them in a flattened, disengaged way. Whereas in a museum your eye is being drawn to the objects on the wall, the texture etc. They're lit up.
 

suspended

Well-known member
Good thread. Cool documentary project.

If GGL were still on top of its shit the virtual world you mention already would've happened and it would be amazing to hang out there. Fully rendered 3D replica of reality. Train a NN to autogenerate model from satellite pics.
 

linebaugh

Well-known member
I find looking the hardest thing to do at an art gallery.

At one pole you walk around not the gallery totally uninterested in it all, and so never take a moment to stop and look at anything.

At the other pole you've read enough about art history to make you stop and look at things more patiently, but your head is so full of history and polemics that you can't really look at anything without seeking to categorise it.

Does this make sense?

This is why I find smoking weed almost a compulsory part of going to a gallery. Sometimes it makes me over thoughtful but often it helps me see things so vividly that I don't need the analytic crutch to direct my eyes/enjoyment...

I'll focus on basic observations to snap out of this mode. 'I like this bit here with the green and blue' 'look at the face the man in the background making' and etc. a piece of land to return to before zooming out into cold analytics. Makes having a person with you very helpful as you're pointing and speaking- using the body to get out of youre own head.
 

linebaugh

Well-known member
This might be another sidebar but I've really become aware in recent years of how shit a lot of things look when photographed – because the camera takes a picture of what's "really" there, whereas the human eye is constantly focusing on things nad making them look bigger and more vivid. Obvious example would be taking a picture of a landscape and the hills that occupy most of your vision look tiny and shit in the photograph. Realised how we still need painting to capture what we see, which is better than what's really there.
I think alot of contemporary art is a reaction against this. A little crossover with the emporers new clothes thread here: a banana taped to the wall is better in photo than it is in the flesh.
 

linebaugh

Well-known member
Once walked through an exhibit that I thought was shit until I read the accompanying booklet. The artists expressed purpose was to make pieces that were meant only to be viewed through photograph, and the attached photos backed up the point. thats probably 'the point' of tons of work, whether admitted (or realized by the artists themselves) or not.
 

boxedjoy

Well-known member
what makes it more upsetting and strange is that this sort of thing was quite sophisticated at one stage. there has been a regression into barbarity and i dont totally know why
the biggest inspiration on the music I make!
 

suspended

Well-known member
I find looking the hardest thing to do at an art gallery.

At one pole you walk around not the gallery totally uninterested in it all, and so never take a moment to stop and look at anything.

At the other pole you've read enough about art history to make you stop and look at things more patiently, but your head is so full of history and polemics that you can't really look at anything without seeking to categorise it.

Does this make sense?

This is why I find smoking weed almost a compulsory part of going to a gallery. Sometimes it makes me over thoughtful but often it helps me see things so vividly that I don't need the analytic crutch to direct my eyes/enjoyment...
One of my favorite things is smoking a doobie and going to the Rubin Museum in New York, just getting lost in the endless details of its mandalas and statues

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Corpsey

call me big papa
Often it's the smallest paintings at a gallery that can be the most powerful but you have to make an effort to squint and scrutinise them.

I wonder if nowadays, with all the visual stimulation we get via technology, it's only the biggest and most dramatic artworks that really "punch through" with people without an effort. Certainly a lot of the most famous modern artists work at a huge scale (or find some other way to shock).
 

mvuent

Void Dweller
"When you're in Street View mode in Google Maps, if a clock icon is displayed under the address at the top-left of the map then historical street view imagery is available there. Click down arrow under the clock to expand the dates when imagery is available. You can click the different dates on the timeline to preview the imagery.

Try visiting a location that is known to have historical street view imagery. For example, visit Google's home campus (1600 Amphitheatre Pkwy, Mountain View, CA 94043). Next open street view then you'll see the clock icon under the address showing dates for historical street view imagery."
the earliest photos look ancient now. encroaching fog of war.

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mvuent

Void Dweller
had to check on the magic pond inexplicably situated in the middle of my neighborhood. i think it might be a portal of some kind. interestingly it used to be more of an island, an isolated miniature wilderness. always had that little path around it that leads nowhere though.

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mvuent

Void Dweller
honestly catalog i'm really glad you pointed this feature out. it's like being able to access forgotten memories.
 

catalog

Well-known member
Glad it's of use. I found out about it through Jarett Kobek, in his book "Only Americans Burn in Hell". He quotes this location in LA which you see turning into a tent city as you scroll through the time line.

"In 2007 AD, Google introduced Google Street View.

Google Street View was a massive invasion of privacy.

It worked like this: Google bought cameras that could take a full 360-degree image.

Google strapped these cameras atop cars, and then hired people to drive these cars around America, while the camera took photographs every five feet. Then, using GPS geolocation, Google matched the images taken by the cameras to virtual locations on Google Maps.

You could put an address into Google Maps and see that location’s real-world appearance at the exact moment when Google committed a privacy violation.
In 2014 AD, a timeline feature was introduced, which allowed the user to view the full history of Google’s privacy violations.

In some places, this didn’t mean anything, because Google had only sent a car out once.

In major cities, like Los Angeles, you could use the Street View timeline to look at a dense archive of imagery.
Reader, here is a game that you can play.
Go to Google Maps and search for “5th Street & Crocker Los Angeles.”

Go to Street View.

Google will display its most recent invasion of privacy.

If you’re savvy, you’ll be able to figure out how to use the timeline.

If you aren’t, ask a friend.

Go to the earliest image on the timeline, which should be from 2007 AD.

What you will see is an intersection in Skid Row.

While not in the best shape, it is not overrun with human misery.

Now move forward through the timeline.
Watch as the years pass by and watch as the human misery accumulates. Watch as the tents rise up. Watch as the suffering mounts. Watch as the bullshit con of America fails its most vulnerable citizens. Watch as liberal democracy dies.

And, yes, reader, it is sad.

And, yes, it is a shame.

But here we are.

You and me.

Or as they say in Turkish: sen ve ben bebek.

And we’re still doing nothing.

Worse than HRH!

But doing nothing is better than Google, a corporation which has decided that, facing a social cataclysm, the appropriate course of action is to violate the privacy of the homeless and then post the evidence on the Internet."
 
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