Games People Play

william_kent

Well-known member
it's just that I got interested in procedural generation of mazes, led to checking source code of roguelike games to see how they generated dungeons, started reading about the history...
 

WashYourHands

Well-known member
Bit like certain bird feeders you can get now of the puzzle variety

The birds have to figure out out which hatch ways to move in order to progress the movement of their treats

Brilliant way to train dogs to heel too in a similar fashion, as opposed to lab rats in maze
 

maxi

Active member
this ones about discipline, maturity, practical application, not just sitting around dreaming anymore, stresses of adulthood

life is real, life is serious now -- 'no more fun & games'. maybe it used to be a game but not anymore

"this aint a game -- it's too real to be a game"
 

william_kent

Well-known member
there was a whole economy based around poor Chinese doing 8 hour shifts picking herbs in World Of Warcraft - "farming gold" - for those bust Westerners who didn't have the time or inclination to "grind"

there was a youtube comment I saw on a Skyrim video where the commenter complained that they spent an hour "spamming" fireballs at a horse so they could progress to "fire mage" level

Neal Stephonson's Reamde is a novel that has a MMORPG's economy as a theme - features some interesting ideas about how virtual economies could be exploited for money laundering purposes and other criminal enterprises - unfortunately ends up as a bit of bad guys chasing good guys thriller though...
 

suspended

Well-known member
"armour class" and "hit points" derive from a table top naval war-game popular in 60s Chicago - the ships would have a value assigned for amour, and once their hit points were depleted the ship would sink - this was borrowed by the Lake Geneva guys for D&D and ends up in computer games as "armour rating" and "health"
This was a fascinating history, thank you.
 

IdleRich

IdleRich
there was a whole economy based around poor Chinese doing 8 hour shifts picking herbs in World Of Warcraft - "farming gold" - for those bust Westerners who didn't have the time or inclination to "grind"

there was a youtube comment I saw on a Skyrim video where the commenter complained that they spent an hour "spamming" fireballs at a horse so they could progress to "fire mage" level

Neal Stephonson's Reamde is a novel that has a MMORPG's economy as a theme - features some interesting ideas about how virtual economies could be exploited for money laundering purposes and other criminal enterprises - unfortunately ends up as a bit of bad guys chasing good guys thriller though...
Wasn't there one where there was a game where you could buy and sell coins or whatever people used to offer their stashes on ebay for real money, so there was a kind of exchange rate - and someone stole "in game" something very valuable, in the game, but also, cos of that exchange rate that existed, also arguably valuable IRL and there was debate about whether fraud had been committed or not?
 

william_kent

Well-known member
Wasn't there one where there was a game where you could buy and sell coins or whatever people used to offer their stashes on ebay for real money, so there was a kind of exchange rate - and someone stole "in game" something very valuable, in the game, but also, cos of that exchange rate that existed, also arguably valuable IRL and there was debate about whether fraud had been committed or not?

ended up in a murder case

BEIJING (Reuters) - A Shanghai online game player stabbed to death a competitor who sold his cyber-sword, the China Daily said Wednesday, creating a dilemma in China where no law exists for the ownership of virtual weapons.

Qiu Chengwei, 41, stabbed competitor Zhu Caoyuan repeatedly in the chest after he was told Zhu had sold his "dragon saber," used in the popular online game, "Legend of Mir 3," the newspaper said a Shanghai court was told Tuesday.

"Legend of Mir 3" features heroes and villains, sorcerers and warriors, many of whom wield enormous swords.

Qiu and a friend jointly won their weapon last February, and lent it to Zhu who then sold it for 7,200 yuan (US$870), the newspaper said.

Qui went to the police to report the "theft" but was told the weapon was not real property protected by law.

"Zhu promised to hand over the cash but an angry Qui lost patience and attacked Zhu at his home, stabbing him in the left chest with great force and killing him," the court was told.

The newspaper did not specify the charge against Qiu but said he had given himself up to police and already pleaded guilty to "intentional injury."

No verdict has been announced.

More and more online gamers were seeking justice through the courts over stolen weapons and credits, the newspaper said.

"The armor and swords in games should be deemed as private property as players have to spend money and time for them," Wang Zongyu, an associate law professor at Beijing's Renmin University of China, was quoted as saying.

But other experts are calling for caution. "The 'assets' of one player could mean nothing to others as they are by nature just data created by game providers," a lawyer for a Shanghai-based Internet game company was quoted as saying
 
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