Catalog's hip hop journey

rubberdingyrapids

Well-known member
when a rapper whose ancestors were previously called
this all sounds nice and all but the fact that it was a Common gig at the height of his powers really has me wondering what that crowd look like and if your sentiment of inclusion was shared with others

as the middle class white lads adopting rap and the blues i mean it all part of one ugly lineage that as much as people try to address still hasn't gone away one bit, not to mention the people who write about the music look at the previous generation swear they won't repeat the same mistakes and then do so anyway
lol i was being sarcastic but idk, people just like music and dont care about what comes with it. will happen until the end of time.
 

woops

is not like other people
sometimes i catch myself wondering why do people like music (so much) it's just a load of noises and then i remember it sounds good and you can dance to it, with a partner if you like and it addresses a range of emotions and can carry a message
 

woops

is not like other people
plus other reasons too but im damned if im gonna start a thread called why do people like music.
 

woops

is not like other people
i'd incite a woops music journey thread BUT it's 5 to 11 and i never play music after 11
 

shakahislop

Well-known member
This is like one of the best things about rap, the way its ceaselessly reinventing itself. It's one of the things I really enjoy, getting a WTAF moment, though I know I'm too old to dedicate myself to pursuing life's meaning through nerding out on a rap subgenre anymore, I still get hit like that fairly often.
yeah this is it for me too. it moves on really fast. i've always assumed this is because the 'ecosystem' just involves so many people, there's a massive audience, there's a load of people who rap, there's a load of people who make beats, and the barriers to entry are pretty low as well.

also have the impression that there's more of a taste for novelty among the audience and more importantly, it's properly commercial music which is made for a demographic which involves a lot of 16 year olds, a lot of people who aren't that 'into music', a cross-class and cross-gender demographic, and which therefore does not fuck around when it comes to rejecting traditions or the way things are supposed to be done.
 

rubberdingyrapids

Well-known member
sometimes i catch myself wondering why do people like music (so much) it's just a load of noises and then i remember it sounds good and you can dance to it, with a partner if you like and it addresses a range of emotions and can carry a message
people just like a noise on in the background. helps get rid of their own thoughts. sometimes it can help them understand their own thoughts. sometimes it can make them think someone elses thoughts of a different background are the same as their own and they will be astonished at this leap of connection. sometimes this will make them believe things that arent true.
 

DannyL

Wild Horses
yeah this is it for me too. it moves on really fast. i've always assumed this is because the 'ecosystem' just involves so many people, there's a massive audience, there's a load of people who rap, there's a load of people who make beats, and the barriers to entry are pretty low as well.

also have the impression that there's more of a taste for novelty among the audience and more importantly, it's properly commercial music which is made for a demographic which involves a lot of 16 year olds, a lot of people who aren't that 'into music', a cross-class and cross-gender demographic, and which therefore does not fuck around when it comes to rejecting traditions or the way things are supposed to be done.
To crosspost with the Dave thread, this is why that album sounds 5 years behind US rap. It's strong lyrically but doesn't innovate musically in the way US rap seems to just do continuously.
 

shakahislop

Well-known member
To crosspost with the Dave thread, this is why that album sounds 5 years behind US rap. It's strong lyrically but doesn't innovate musically in the way US rap seems to just do continuously.
it's not a particularly sophisticated analysis but i've always assumed that this is because there are about five people in the UK who rap, whereas in the US I regularly see random people walking down the street rapping to themselves. which is a weird phenomenon. amazed that people have the confidence to do it. maybe i should start doing it on my way to work, with my nice work shirt on, i mean i don't know how to do it, but yesterday i heard the sleaford mods guy rap on a Bug beat and he clearly doesn't know how to do it either
 

luka

Well-known member
Dave makes conservative music for conservative people. There are plenty of Americans who do the same. I don't think considered
as a whole US rap is more innovative than UK music.
 

DannyL

Wild Horses
Dave makes conservative music for conservative people. There are plenty of Americans who do the same. I don't think considered
as a whole US rap is more innovative than UK music.
I'd agree, I think. I think there's plenty of sonic innovation in UK music just not in rap as such, more in drill it seems to me anyway. The noticable think about the US is the way experimental stuff becomes hugely successful and in fact the mainstream - think of Thug, Chief Keef and others. Even Future is pretty out there at times
 

catalog

Well-known member
here's the next 2 tunes @catalog :


Both pretty good.

First one reminds me of de la soul. Bit rougher, lower production values. But maybe similar era.

The cover has that graphic style I associate with 90s new York. Spike Lee.

Good samples. Good feeling of a crew.

The only thing I don't really like is the tone in the voice. Bit jump up / smiley.

But good still, even better on 2nd listen. There's a lot of different sounds and textures going on. "This is the part where we get in a circle..."

2nd one, I definitely heard of aesop rock, may have even heard this one before. This is like intelligent hip hop or something? I like the sounds and it feels like a decent production, very tight. Good tone of voice as well. Got that slight rock rap crossover feel with the chorus, it's got a guitar band feel to it.

This feels a bit later on? Early 2000s. Got that bit in it where everything drops out for a second and there's an a capella, that feels like something that was happening quite a lot for a while.

Think I prefer both of these to the previous 2.
 

DannyL

Wild Horses
Catalog, one thing I've noticed in this thread is that you don't really talk about lyrics or the rap itself. To me, that's one of the most important components and being a rap fan is in part about deep involvement on this level. There is that dichotomy between rap lyric and rap as sound but still - it seems missing from your analysis. Is this accurate? Fair? Thoughts?
 

luka

Well-known member
The only thing I don't really like is the tone in the voice. Bit jump up / smiley.
@CrowleyHead has a bit about this... are you there?

says that '94 NY rap with its furrowed brows and criminal mindedness cast everything that preceded it
as corny, goofy, happy-go-lucky
 
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