I can get behind a lot of that, but the leap to "it's racist" is a massive one. Sure, ecofascism is a thing, but in terms either of its general popularity or the threat it poses, it's small beer next to regular vanilla not-at-all-eco fascism, which for the most part is violently anti-green.


get what you're saying bit think 'nature is a racist concept' is a rhetorical move and not a statement on ecofascism stuff, which is related but kind of separate thing.
 

luka

Well-known member
 

WashYourHands

Cat Malogen
It’s intentionally provocative but a neat was of saying that a bumblebee is as natural as a smartphone. Part of the way this hippy guy means it might be about extending our inclusiveness, our we, to other species, all living things, all objects. But the concept of nature implies something that we are not part of, are destroying, etc. and, part of the problem with some forms of environmentalism is this idea that there can be some return to some former pure state, that there even was a break, thats an illusion. And obviously this desire for return to a former pure state is a big component of fascism etc

 

Mr. Tea

Shub-Niggurath, Please
get what you're saying bit think 'nature is a racist concept' is a rhetorical move and not a statement on ecofascism stuff, which is related but kind of separate thing.
So he's saying "the concept of nature is racist" in more or less the same way a 12-year-old might say "maths is well gay"?
 

poetix

we murder to dissect
There's a sort of short-circuit in the Morton quote between "the concept of nature, and the nature/culture split, is used in certain racist constructions to consign a class of humans to a sort of interzone between the fully natural and the fully social" and "therefore the concept of nature is itself racist". Well, no: there are different possible constructions of nature, the natural and so on, and they're used in different ways in different contexts to do different things. In philosophy I hold to a methodological naturalism which holds that all attributes of the human derive from our being in nature in the last instance: there is no added "special something" that has descended from the heavens and infused us with a divine spark of whatever, it's all scaffolded up through evolution. But I might also talk about wanting to go out and spend some time around a bit of nature, by which I primarily mean the sort of flora and fauna you don't see so much of in a built environment. Unlike certain people I don't see the latter as the Mansion of Authenticity - or Satan's Church, for that matter.
 

luka

Well-known member
well this is it. you dont gain anything by saying a walk through an industrial estate is also a nature walk. it's inane. having said that i dont want to sheils to be grumpy with me any more.
 

catalog

Well-known member
isn't that then just about language? ie that "nature" has come to mean a certain thing and people are now wanting it to mean something else?
 

catalog

Well-known member
that semiotexte d&g has a great opening line:

"We wrote anti-oedipus together. As each of us was several, that already made quite a few people."
 
Adam McKay of don’t look up and anchorman fame, his production company is hyper-object industries. Inspired by the guy who coined the the phrase ‘nature is a racist concept’, Tim Morton
 
He’s into all that object oriented philosophy stuff. Decentering the human. Kpunk flirted with it. I gave the graham harman book a go and struggled with some of it. Partly tripping over definitions… or distinctions between event and object
 

Clinamenic

θερμοδυναμικός καπιταλιστής
I thought Don't Look Up nailed a lot of the zeitgeist stuff about disavowal and misinformation/disinformation.

edit: and about alienation/distrust of elites, distrust of scientists, etc.
 
Last edited:
Top