perfect melodies

the real power of dance music is its got no climax and no resolution, no return. It's pure orbitals in motion. In this sense it's all trance, and why trance the genre in some senses can said to be the death of dance music, because drug triggers were consciously produced rather than being encoded into the limitations of tech/social mixing etc.
nice. That’s a distinction that came up in my head when thinking about the question of perfection ie a sense of completion and satisfaction or the infinite tease
 
I can think of loads of climactic dance music based entirely around the things you don’t like but I know you mean your pure conception of dance music
 

thirdform

Well-known member
nice. That’s a distinction that came up in my head when thinking about the question of perfection ie a sense of completion and satisfaction or the infinite tease

Well yes. Dance music is not supposed to be complete in that sense, otherwise it would not be so dj friendly. This is why those genres fail, because they have to have huge outros for mixing. a lot of pop house also suffers from this problem, it's trapped between wanting to be in the charts and wanting to be fodder for the dj to use in the construction of groove. It's a reality mr. Tim Finney used to struggle with a lot because poptimism (the creedo he subscribes to) has no room for jazz or funk whatsoever, so the idea of the continuous groove gets confused with musical innovations, rather than genre innovations.
 

thirdform

Well-known member
I can think of loads of climactic dance music based entirely around the things you don’t like but I know you mean your pure conception of dance music

I don't think so.

Jungle is anti-climactic for instance, even when its going for the drowning in her type of emotional bomb vibe. It's about technicality, not preference.
 
There’s a specific chop used a lot between a few hats in the amen break which is the perfect encapsulation of that addictive edging suspense. You know what I mean don’t you?
 

thirdform

Well-known member
you can, for instance play vocal and melodic house bombs one after another after another after another in a pub of non-dance music fans. But when you are playing to actual dance music fans you are highly likely to clear the floor and make a mess out of it. This doesn't have to do with purism. Even the garage house djs like Paul Anderson, Alastair Whitehead etc always used to balance out their vocal bombs with a healthy amount of loopy or dub tracks.
 

thirdform

Well-known member
edging is a good skill to learn to have. especially for the likes of @Corpsey. hold your breath in, do not make a single noise when you climax, foolish boy
 

thirdform

Well-known member
right. Let us continue. Extreme euphoria and exaltation perfected, melancholy only serving the function of amplifying the alcohol, hashish and opium rush (preferably all taken together with your local prostitutes in some dingy mayhane with mafia grandads and criminal barons) where the real solidarity is, not self-righteous 'protect xyz at all costs.'

Impossible, were it not for me possessing my dreams. Listen as the kanun and the strings gently glide up and down leading one to a yearning plateau much greater than any cocaine electro house bomb where you could be king of the world and smash a load of bottles against the club windows. This world is yours.

 

thirdform

Well-known member
Works best with Yvonne De Carlo dancing to it in Criss Cross.


Yes. Brilliant.

On that note.


was gonna type something about how explosive this is for the time, pure economy of speed, but the youtube description does it more justice.

When someone says Jazz or Swing, or Hot Jazz (if many non-collectors know what it really is), generally you'll have a variety of people you would think of first. Duke Ellington, Benny Goodman, Tommy Dorsey, and the inevitable Louis Armstrong. Though when I hear those genres, I'm more partial to another instrumental part of the advancement of all three genres listed. (Sometimes even unfairly so in comparison of others mentioned in the past.) That instrumental piece is of course the fabled pianist, arranger, and bandleader Fletcher Henderson. A man with a consistently changing sound, desirable roster of musicians, incredible discography, credited as one of the creators of swing, and has a great argument going for him having the hottest jazz orchs in the dance band era. Listening to his records are always a rewarding experience. His bands, when not under a vast amount of pseudonym, went under the standard "and his orchestra", His Hot Five, His Big Band, Connie's Inn Orchestra, and more titles. He also played for many bands including Will Bradley's, Joe Smiths, Bessie Smith's, Benny Goodman's (multiple, and frequently arranged for him too), Ethel Waters, and others.

 
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