Cosmetic Surgery

version

Well-known member
I don't have a specific point to make about it at present, but it's becoming increasingly common and exerts huge influence due to its prevalence among celebrities and the allure of being able to alter things you don't like about yourself.

The other day I read an article about a bloke who paid 75k to have someone break his legs, insert expanding titanium rods into the bone and add a couple of inches to his height...

 

version

Well-known member
I don't think there's any way you can argue this stuff hasn't been given a massive boost by dating apps and social media. The height thing in particular is something you hear a lot about re: men on Tinder.
 

shakahislop

Well-known member
i think in general something pretty major is going on in anglo society (at a minimum) with regards to people being aware of what they look like, and having a strong emotional relationship with their own perception of their own appearance. ubiquitous photography and video is quite a big deal i think and its something that is changing on a truly global level, to all of humanity
 

version

Well-known member
i think in general something pretty major is going on in anglo society (at a minimum) with regards to people being aware of what they look like, and having a strong emotional relationship with their own perception of their own appearance. ubiquitous photography and video is quite a big deal i think and its something that is changing on a truly global level, to all of humanity

Yeah, absolutely. I think there's a good chance we'd collectively be much happier if we spent less time looking at ourselves.

It's strange to think there was a time when you'd only catch sight of yourself whilst looking into a body of water.
 

woops

is not like other people
Yeah, absolutely. I think there's a good chance we'd collectively be much happier if we spent less time looking at ourselves.

It's strange to think there was a time when you'd only catch sight of yourself whilst looking into a body of water.
or when gazing into the eyes of another, obligatory remark
 

mixed_biscuits

_________________________
On the one hand, there is the moral obligation to please others with beauty; on the other, the injunction against mendacity
 

version

Well-known member
It feels as though there's a steadily increasing number of physical traits for people to be self conscious about. I never heard anyone seriously worrying about things like canthal tilt or wrist thickness until very recently.
 
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Mr. Tea

Shub-Niggurath, Please
I don't have a specific point to make about it at present, but it's becoming increasingly common and exerts huge influence due to its prevalence among celebrities and the allure of being able to alter things you don't like about yourself.

The other day I read an article about a bloke who paid 75k to have someone break his legs, insert expanding titanium rods into the bone and add a couple of inches to his height...

Dude's obviously just lazy.

tweet-taylor-scalf-butt-cheek-slol-no-excuse-for-guys-3526237.png
 
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version

Well-known member
Invisalign's becoming more common over here, also veneers and whitening. I've noticed more and more British celebrities having those white, plastic-looking teeth like they do in the US.
 

boxedjoy

Well-known member
if I could afford it I would have so much plastic surgery - not that I dislike myself but I would like myself more
 

version

Well-known member
I'd be tempted, but then I'd also worry about it never being enough and ending up like one of those botched celebrities. There doesn't seem to be any way back at that point. It looks incredibly painful too.
 

boxedjoy

Well-known member
even if I ended up botched I would still be happy because it would tell the world that I was successful enough to afford multiple surgeries and not have to worry about the consequences beyond ending up in some tabloid photo articles about bad surgery
 

version

Well-known member
Hair transplants seem to be increasingly common too, along with stuff like finasteride and minoxidil to try to stop it falling out in the first place.
 

version

Well-known member
yen with hair transplants i'm starting to feel it's becoming the norm
I guess we're well on the way to baldness becoming seen as some sort of personal failing or affliction of poverty when the rich can just pay to keep or replace their hair.
 

woops

is not like other people
I guess we're well on the way to baldness becoming seen as some sort of personal failing or affliction of poverty when the rich can just pay to keep or replace their hair.
this can only spark a counter-movement back to victorian levels of hirstuticity, perhaps has already begun!
 

blissblogger

Well-known member
Apparently it's very common in South Korea.

you should have put put a warning before that link
 
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