Cosmetic Surgery

shakahislop

Well-known member
i suppose more specifically: all of that shit now applies to men as well as women. i remember the first time i heard men discussing moisturiser and the right kind of shampoo to buy for their hair type. it was 2008. i couldn't believe they weren't embarrassed. they were british south asian 20 year olds from expensive schools.
 

version

Well-known member
i suppose more specifically: all of that shit now applies to men as well as women. i remember the first time i heard men discussing moisturiser and the right kind of shampoo to buy for their hair type. it was 2008. i couldn't believe they weren't embarrassed. they were british south asian 20 year olds from expensive schools.
It makes sense from a business perspective as it was a huge and untapped market.
 

version

Well-known member
i was having a chat with a guy a few weeks ago who recently had a hair transplant, in turkey. he was explaining the procedure, its very detailed and methodical. they take hair from the chest and then manually reinsert it into the scalp. like 3 or 4 people, for a few hours a day. sounds kinda intense. sadly i could not tell at all, but maybe in 6 months or so if i see him again, i'll notice.
I've never heard of them taking hair from the chest. What I've heard is that the hair round the back of your head usually never falls out, so they take it from there and stitch it into the front.

The thing with hair transplants as well is that you have to take medication to keep it from just falling out again and the medication can have side effects like impotence, gynecomastia and depression, plus your hair might just fall out anyway, so you could end up spending a fortune to arrive at a place much worse than if you'd just shaved your head.
 

version

Well-known member
the shaved/buzzed head thing for guys seemed to negate the hair loss issue for a long time, is that no longer an acceptable option?
I think that's still the best option, but nobody wants to lose their hair in the first place, so any treatment claiming to prevent that is bound to appeal.
 

version

Well-known member
The best hair transplant I've seen is probably Conte's.

before-after.jpg
 

Leo

Well-known member
I think that's still the best option, but nobody wants to lose their hair in the first place, so any treatment claiming to prevent that is bound to appeal.

true. luckily still have mine, but with slightly receding hairline in the past five years or so. if I lost it, I'd definitely buzz it as opposed shave it. I'm sure I'd have an unattractive scalp. Bezos is a smoothie but that shiny look is creepy.

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version

Well-known member
The other thing with this stuff is it often seems quite noticeable. You don't really look like you have your natural hair, you look like you've had a transplant.
 

version

Well-known member
One of the other things you can do for hair loss is get what's called a "hair system", which just seems to be a wig they've tried to give a cool name to.

:ROFLMAO:
 

version

Well-known member
I read an article a while back about the impact Instagram was having on women's self image and they interviewed a surgeon who said photo editing software had warped some people's perception so much that he'd have them coming in and asking for things which weren't physically possible.
 

blissblogger

Well-known member
one tangential thing to this: at some point there was definitely a subcultural strand of not being at all worried about what you looked like, beyond brushing your teeth or whatever. i see that nowhere now. ok so i live in manhattan and on the internet, these are the worst places to try to find all of that, but it does to me seem to have vanished. more or less everyone seems to be considering their appearance, and doing a lot to modify it, its a whole hobby in a way.

Bohemian people at one point looked scruffy - messy hair, sweaters with holes, second hand clothing, in etc. Not washing very often. E.g. how Scritti looked in their squat days. Your mental energy was meant to be devoted to higher things than appearance, although I suppose people would also use it to signal undergroundness or allegiances (so the drummer in Scritti, Tom Morley, had the dreadlocks - a very unusual look for a white man in those days).

Nowadays, hip people look incredibly groomed - with ultra-precise detailing. There doesn't seem to be a bohemian look as such. Well, I guess there are still crusties (are there still crusties?) or their modern equivalent.
 

version

Well-known member
Detail's a good word for this discussion. Everything's becoming more detailed. You could probably spend a lifetime just learning about hair care, not to mention diet, exercise, dental care and the rest and that's just upkeep of your own body. You're not even getting into what you need to know for your given career, general knowledge, history etc.

The other thing's how swiftly and relentlessly things are observed and dissected. I read something earlier about a new face people are puling in their selfies. There doesn't seem to be anything you can do that won't immediately be picked up on and become 'a thing', like what Corpse, Web and I have said before about those 'type of person' memes where whatever you're into will be turned into personality template.
 
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