‘Tyranny of Busyness’

sufi

lala
I have been thinking about this for a while, this fetish that people have about being busy, appearing busy, keeping busy etc an all that flows from maintaining that attitude towards your life, and the motivations for adopting that mindset.

So I signed up for this impending event, i'm intrigued, and also glad to have found some kindred spirits
sounds like there are still spaces! join in?
anyhow i'll report back (if i tune in on Friday)
Hello all,

Thank you for registering for the free coaching workshop taking place this Friday (24 June). It's set to be a brilliant event with movement leaders registered from across the world.

Do you know anyone else who might be interested in coming along? If so, feel free to invite them to join. We've drafted a message at the bottom of this email you could send.

Here's a reminder of the event details:

What: Coaching workshop: Overcoming the ‘tyranny of busyness’ in our movements and organisations

When: Friday 24 June 2022, 11-12.30pm UTC (12-1.30pm BST/UK time)

Where: You can find your Zoom link by searching for an email from Zoom with the subject line: "Free Online Coaching Workshop: Overcoming the ‘tyranny of busyness’ in our movements and organisations Confirmation."


Looking forward to seeing you on Friday!

Best wishes,

Emma


Draft email to send to others:

Hello,

I hope you're well. I've signed up to attend a free coaching workshop on Friday (24 June) and I wondered if you'd like to join me? More info below!

Thanks :)



What: Overcoming the ‘tyranny of busyness’ in our movements and organisations
When: Friday 24 June 2022, 11-12.30pm UTC (12-1.30pm BST/UK time)
Where: On Zoom -
register for your spot here.
How much?
Free!



What is the workshop all about?
Rushing from one thing to the next. Never getting to the end of a to-do list. Missing deadlines. No time to think.

There. Are. Always. More. Things.To. Do.
What is the impact of this constant state of ‘busyness’ on us as individuals, on our teams and within our movements - and what can we do about it?
This workshop will explore how a coaching approach can help us to focus on what is important, carve out the space to deliberate, make better decisions and treat ourselves and each other with more care. We’ll combine theory and practice and you'll leave the workshop with some practical suggestions that you can start using straight away.

Register for your spot here.


The workshop will be facilitated by:

Faduma Hassan
has a background in education, training and mentoring and is a qualified secondary school teacher. She has extensive organising, campaigning and stakeholder engagement experience working for both grassroots organisations and for the UK Labour Party. She worked on the Doreen Lawrence Review which documented the disproportionate impact of COVID-19 on Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic communities and has supported the design and facilitation of leadership programmes for groups underrepresented in politics, including the Bernie Grant Leadership Programme.

Adam Klug is a certified coach and social justice organiser. He facilitates international retreats for emerging global leaders who are working to build a more sustainable future. He is a co-founder of Momentum in the UK, where he played a central role in developing the organisation from its launch around a borrowed table with no money, to a volunteer-driven mass membership organisation, internationally renowned for innovative campaigning. Adam played a leading role in introducing a host of distributed organising techniques, enabling hundreds of thousands of people to participate in campaigns at scale and is a founding member of Europe’s largest political festival, The World Transformed.

Emma Rees is a certified coach and supports people who are working towards climate, social and racial justice. She is a co-founder of Momentum and served as a National Organiser from the organisation’s launch through to late 2017. She was part of a small team that built Momentum from the ground up, from an email list to an activist organisation with over 42,000 dues paying members. She coordinated the 2017 general election campaign which mobilised tens of thousands of volunteers and played a decisive role in Labour’s comeback.

Register for your spot here.



Emma Rees
Senior Advisor at The Social PracticeWe help progressive organisations and movements build people-power and scale. See more at www.thesocialpractice.org/eu
 

luka

Well-known member
i actually cant do anything now. once you get out the habit you can never get out of it again. my dad warned me about
this he said laziness is the hardest habit to break and he was right.
 

Leo

Well-known member
I can't relate to people with rammed calendars who are always busy, I couldn't live like that. They're missing out on the great benefits of sometimes having nothing to do. Some people seem afraid of having nothing to do, since it confronts them and causes them to think and wonder about things as opposed to do things. I know a guy who literally can't stay home for an entire Saturday or Sunday, needs to have plans, preferably a few things to fill most of the day and/or night.

I wouldn't want to have nothing to do every day, but I love having nothing to do from time to time. I just came off 10 days vacation from work and wife and it was great.
 

WashYourHands

Cat Malogen
I have been thinking about this for a while, this fetish that people have about being busy, appearing busy, keeping busy etc an all that flows from maintaining that attitude towards your life, and the motivations for adopting that mindset.

So I signed up for this impending event, i'm intrigued, and also glad to have found some kindred spirits
sounds like there are still spaces! join in?
anyhow i'll report back (if i tune in on Friday)

prepare for sweaty over-caffeination
 

shakahislop

Well-known member
was a bugbear of mine a while ago, as people got into their late 20s they seemed to become more troubled, more pathological, filling all the time with pottery classes, language classes, balloon festivals, destination dinners, whatever.

i've noticed a lot less of it among people i know since the pandemic
 

Clinamenic

θερμοδυναμικός καπιταλιστής
I may even go as far as to say that busyness is the central post-Protestant virtue.
 

Clinamenic

θερμοδυναμικός καπιταλιστής
beyond actual work and more the appearance of work.
I do think the actual productivity has substantive value to it, to certain extents, IE contributing to society. Even if it’s just a platitude to many. But yeah then there is the more superficial busyness-signaling which is adopted, consciously or otherwise, as a proxy for successfulness.
 

Clinamenic

θερμοδυναμικός καπιταλιστής
I can relate to it. Having a packed Google calendar of multicolored blocks, a mosaic of busyness, I must be going places, etc
 

okzharp

Active member
I remember reading a convincing reassuringly-sloppily-written thing about the critical role of boredom in ALL the meaningful scientific discoveries and works of art/literature.
 

wektor

Well-known member
I remember reading a convincing reassuringly-sloppily-written thing about the critical role of boredom in ALL the meaningful scientific discoveries and works of art/literature.
sounds interesting, mind to drop the source?
 
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