Robbi Jade Lew Megathread

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One of the biggest scandals in poker history has been going down the last few weeks

Robbi Jade Lew, an amateur player, hero calls Adelstein, the most profitable player in the history of the show.

Start here if you're interested:


Will start posting commentary/discourse below
 
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Some Poker YT world takes:



The pretty universal consensus I've seen among high-stakes poker players is that this is, by far, the most insane and unusual play they've ever seen.

I don't for a second doubt there's a ton of sexism in the industry, but I also tend to think that insider hunches, red flag feelings—"something is not right here" from people who have been GPT-trained on tens of thousands of hands—should be taken pretty seriously.
 

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Some poker forums are veering into more paranoid-conspiratorial takes that TBH sound pretty reasonable as an outsider: This wasn't about the money, this was in fact a pretty normal industry move to rig a game to pump up a player's reputation/fame


Still, you'd think that if this was a group of pro players conspiring, they would've picked a hero call that was just a hair less shocking
 

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One of the biggest scandals in poker history has been going down the last few weeks

Robbi Jade Lew, an amateur player, hero calls Adelstein, the most profitable player in the history of the show.

Start here if you're interested:


Will start posting commentary/discourse below
@linebaugh @luka watch this, the commentary is whatever, but this is a crazy video
 

Corpsey

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There's been a huge cheating scandal in chess recently too hasn't there

I wish I was clever enough both to play chess and cheat at it
 

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While Fred Lorz was greeted as the apparent winner, he was later disqualified as he had hitched a ride in a car for part of the race. The actual winner, Thomas Hicks, was near collapse and hallucinating by the end of the race, a side effect of being administered brandy, raw eggs, and strychnine by his trainers.

Cuban postman Andarín Carvajal had also joined the marathon, arriving at the last minute.[6] After losing all of his money gambling in New Orleans, Louisiana, he hitchhiked to St. Louis and had to run the event in street clothes that he cut around the legs to make them look like shorts. Not having eaten in 40 hours, he saw a spectator eating 2 peaches. He asked if he could have the peaches, and the spectator declined. He then stole both peaches and ran away.

The South African entrants, Len Taunyane and Jan Mashiani, finished ninth and twelfth, respectively: this was a disappointment, as many observers were sure Tau could have done better if he had not been chased nearly a mile off course by wild dogs.[8]
 

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Magic scandals:


 

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This is revving up to be an alltime thread. We can talk about cultural relativism and where rules come from. Games as a metaphor for life, social structure, institutional games, etcetera
 

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Yesterday I was playing social deduction games on vidcall with some pals, and there was an iffy case where it wasn't clear whether some line of information gathering was fair game or cheap. The way that question got settled was by deferring to what sorts of information could be obtained in in-person social deduction games, which is where all the players (and of course all the games themselves) got their start.

The spirit of the game was being preserved even as the medium had changed—there was a sense of "original" and "imitation".
 

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Interesting too how the cheaters pushed it too far—competitors' intuitions about how much a fish weighs are well-calibrated and at most you could probably sneak half a pound on em.

Same principle unfolding in the chess and poker scandals—what sets people's radar off is "this is too good to be true, this doesn't pass the eye test, they're getting outsized returns on investment."
 
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