Mr. Tea

Shub-Niggurath, Please
Staff member
Throbbing darkness he looked into throbbing in every cell the mirror was horrid throbbing too much throbbing being this is it the throbbing heart of it. It throbbed telling him you can't escape from the throbbing secret at the very throbbing heart of
Nah, you've over-egged the pudding. Just sounds like pastiche at this point.
 

IdleRich

IdleRich
Ben Lerner pictured shattering the mirror with his throbbing metal chair. From TV he knew there might be people behind it in the throbbing dark, that they could see him. He believed he felt the throbbing pressure of their gaze on his face. In slow motion, a rain of glass, the presences revealed. He paused it, rewound, watched it fall, throbbing, again.
Oh, everyone has already taken the piss out of the surfeit of throbbings.
 

IdleRich

IdleRich
Reminded me of this
“Sunday, 30 August:. My thoughts on Scotland written on the M6 at 120 mph: The hallowed mist rolls away leaving Scotland’s majestic peaks revealed in all their majesty. A shape in the translucent sky reveals itself to be an eagle, that majestic bird of prey. Talons clawing, it lands on a loch, rippling the quiet majesty of the turbulent waters. The eagle pauses only to dip its majestic beak into the aqua before spreading its majestic wings and flying away to its magisterial nest high in the barren, arid, grassless hills. The Highland cattle. Majestic horned beast of the glens lowers its brown-eyed shaggy-haired majestic head as it ruminates on the mysteries of Glencoe.”
 

IdleRich

IdleRich
The majestic mole breasted majestically from the garden's mound. The crude potency of its majestic talons was evident as they throbbed majestically with a barely restrained menace... in the green spaces that remained the as yet untouched grass quivered and throbbed nervously in a way that was completely the opposite of majestic.
 

IdleRich

IdleRich
But yeah, that verse was indeed from the legendary Adrian Mole.
When I first met my girlfriend I noticed she had the first AM book on her shelf and I asked her thoughts on it... but it turned out that her pretentious friend - one of the first people she'd known in the UK, in fact I think they'd known each other by email before she moved to UK, bonded over books... - had seen she had it and had told her not to read it cos it was rubbish. At that point I knew he was a dick.
 

IdleRich

IdleRich
My only complaint with Adrian Mole was I just feel that at times she was too cruel to him... she could have given him a few more little triumphs in his relentlessly (throbbingly) mediocre life.
 

IdleRich

IdleRich
For some reason, you @version taking exception to "gazes" reminds me that one construction that always really grates with me (unfairly I know) is when they write "He got off of the train". And I know that that's just American English but it just can't help feel ugly and unnecessary to me.,
And - total non-sequitur - a question I want to ask our American colleagues - how do you pronounce the word "Herbs"? Cos I often hear it in American things and they say it as "erbs" and, of course, many English people would pronounce it that way lazily, with a dropping your aitches justification. But it always strikes me that even the most well-spoken American says it without the H, not lazily but almost with an aggressive attack on the vowel sound, and it makes me think that the American pronunciation is simply that. This one doesn't annoy me I hasten to add, it's just something I often wonder about and mean to check.
Similarly the word "route" - although I guess I know the answer here (or at least I have my own theory), it feels to me that - for all of us - we have the word "root" as in the thing a plant grows from and which rhymes with boot, and, in the same way, we all agree on the word "rout" as in, to chase someone away, or utterly defeat them, whatever, it rhymes with about - and then there is this third word "route" - as in a path or whatever, the direction one takes on a journey, you know what I mean. And a decision had to be made, how should that be said? Is it a nice soft sound (the same as root) implying a gently wending path through the territory in question, negotiating delicately through the way of least resistance.... or is it a harsh, brash and aggressive sound (the same as rout) that conjures up images of smashing boisterously (even loutishly in fact to continue with the sound) through any obstacles that have the temerity to block it? Of course the effete and self-effacing English chose the former, while the young and powerful denizens land of the motorcar plumped for the latter as they headed west for territories new.
 

IdleRich

IdleRich
The "off of" one is very common in Pynchon I think and at first I thought it was an affectation, that he was deliberately writing like a five year old.
 

IdleRich

IdleRich
Gotten is another one that always sounds to me like something that would be said by a child who can't talk properly - even though, when you think about it, it makes total sense; if we have forgot and forgotten then why on earth can't we follow the same rule with got and gotten?
 

Mr. Tea

Shub-Niggurath, Please
Staff member
Gotten is another one that always sounds to me like something that would be said by a child who can't talk properly - even though, when you think about it, it makes total sense; if we have forgot and forgotten then why on earth can't we follow the same rule with got and gotten?
Isn't this one of those usages that Brits think of as an Americanism, but which was actually a normal part of English speech three or four hundred years ago, when Brits were settling North America?
 
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