WashYourHands

Cat Malogen
Just cum @WashYourHands

fao @woops

This text arrived last week but we came into the orbit of a company known as Apple over the weekend. So now I’ve not only entered a pact with the great corporate Satan and His insistence on surreal usb ports, I’m also retuning my entire relationship with you accursed English, your oppression of all my ancestors and the remnants of this weird, Frieslandic tongue you foisted on all social domains (while admittedly communicating in English here out of good manners let it be said, not in my mother’s tongue, yet quietly as the wife is having a kip)

805C3876-4DF8-486B-9835-B104F3072788.jpeg

Got all 4 of the books owned and borrowed in the frame to to rebuke any slurs of dunderheadedness but will now get labelled thick AND a swot for such alacrity
 

jenks

thread death
My Mind to me a Kingdom is - Paul Stanbridge. It’s likely to appeal to Sebald fans
He circles around his brother’s suicide, bringing in history, geology, arcana and all manner of other sources. Written in a rather meditative manner, it’s catnip for me, it’s one of the best things I’ve read this year. Others, of course, may find it all a bit too much.
Re-reading Proust, on the third volume now and really enjoying the overwhelming lushness of his prose (and how funny he is)
 

jenks

thread death
Which translation @jenks?
Going old school as it’s the only complete set of all of them that I have: the Moncrieff and Kilmartin revised by DJ Enright - I have read the Lydia Davis volume 1 in the past which was ok but not as good as her Bovary. I’ve said it before but Pinter’s in filmed screenplay of Proust is quite amazing. There’s also a very good graphic novel of the first two volumes.
 

Mr. Tea

Shub-Niggurath, Please
Just cum @WashYourHands

fao @woops

This text arrived last week but we came into the orbit of a company known as Apple over the weekend. So now I’ve not only entered a pact with the great corporate Satan and His insistence on surreal usb ports, I’m also retuning my entire relationship with you accursed English, your oppression of all my ancestors and the remnants of this weird, Frieslandic tongue you foisted on all social domains (while admittedly communicating in English here out of good manners let it be said, not in my mother’s tongue, yet quietly as the wife is having a kip)

View attachment 13029

Got all 4 of the books owned and borrowed in the frame to to rebuke any slurs of dunderheadedness but will now get labelled thick AND a swot for such alacrity
Now that's hwæt I call a reading list.
 

luka

Well-known member
I'm reading TIMESCAPE by GREGORY BENFORD. Power is being rationed throughout the country, the Trade Unions are throwing their weight around, Elizabeth has just died and the coronation is still to come.

"The poor don't care do they, as long as they can open a can of beans and have a pint of beer"

"It still feels strange saying 'King' after a whole of 'The Queen' doesn't it?"

The year is 1998.
 

you

Well-known member
@catalog - you should give Butcher Boy by Patrick McCabe a read. I finished it a while back and the question of monsters—and how complicit we are in their development—has haunted me since I put it down. It is a novel with superb voice, but it's also a very resonant exploration of society's treatment and address of antisocial behaviour and personalities.

Currently on Stephanie LaCava's I Fear My Pain Interests You: A Novel. It begins with the narrator—the daughter of a famous couple—emerging from locking herself in a toilet on a plane before disembarking into Montana. This triggers a response in me. Rich Americans moving through transport infrastructures. *Sigh* Something in this vein of literature bothers me. 'It was a Thursday.' 'Everyone downed a drink.'
 

woops

is not like other people
Stephanie LaCava's I Fear My Pain Interests You: A Novel.
ive got one of hers , the superrationals or something, not read it yet. last week i got through david markson this is not a novel. was alright
 

Benny B

Well-known member
I'd only read a couple of Shakespeares when I was at school, so I've been having a great time catching up over the last few weeks. Just read all these back to back for the first time

Hamlet (twice)
King Lear
Macbeth (twice)
Henry IV parts 1 and 2
A Midsummer Night's Dream
Julius Caesar
The Taming of the Shrew
Antony and Cleopatra

Was gonna start Measure for Measure today but I'm still coming down from Antony and Cleopatra, fucking hell
 

Benny B

Well-known member
Got copies of measure for measure, winter's tale, Richard II, Richard III and as you like it here - which should I start next?
 

jenks

thread death
If you’ve done the Henry IVs then you should do RII as a prequel.
WT is one of my favourites- very experimental in terms of shape and structure. Measure is good in performance but hard on the page. AYLI might feel quite light after A&C but is a lovely play. RIII is always worth it - it’s the first history play he does which shows his own way as opposed to the three HVIs which are him warning up to the task.
 

Benny B

Well-known member
This is great, just read act 1, lots of breezy prose and I love all the main characters already. And at the start of act 2 the Dukes just entered with a splendid speech about exile and adversity -

Here we feel not the penalty of Adam,
The seasons' indifference; as the icy fang
And churlish chiding of the winter's wind,
Which when it bites and blows upon my body,
Even till I shrink with cold, I smile and say
'This is no flattery; these are the counsellors
That feelingly persuade me what I am'.
 
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