Illustrations of insects and other flora and fauna

Backjob

Well-known member
I love these. They're great. My gran studied drosophila and had hundreds of pictures of them all over her house. Wasps are the sexiest insects to draw, I reckon.

<IMG SRC="http://www.agnr.umd.edu/MCE/Publications/Graphics/eb248-paperwasp.jpg">

How come these people don't get famous?

<IMG SRC="http://www.agnr.umd.edu/MCE/Publications/Graphics/eb248-yellowjacket.jpg">

I used to live next door to this old lady that painted illustrations of flowers for a living. She did some of mushrooms for my folks. I think there's a whole world out there of people who paint these really detailed studies of nature. I don't reckon universities or textbooks buy them anymore, because photos are cheaper and there are all sorts of special lenses for that now.

<IMG SRC="http://www.mykoweb.com/OldBooks/graphics/ETM_Plate_04.jpg">
 

luka

Well-known member
Staff member
theres still room for those illustrators and some of them do get famous, that american who did all te birds, auberon or something...

i like those identifying books with all pictures of trees or creepy crawlies and if the illustrations are good they#re often more useful than photographs cos the artist makes sure he gets all the angles right and puts in all the salient features and that sort of thing. yup. they're good people. i just saw a reviwe of a book about drawings of birds. not arty ones, scientific ones like youre taling about.
 

rewch

Well-known member
if you find any copies of audubon birds of america let me know...worth millions they are...trouble with books like that though is that they were prohibitively expensive to produce (most of them published by the artists themselves who often, like audubon, went bust) & people liked them so much that they tended to break the books & take the plates out...sad...but true...

in fact the last audubon at auction sold for $8,000,000...
 
Top