IdleRich

IdleRich
Anyone here see Withnail and I?
Pretty much everyone who is English has seen it. Certainly if they were ever a student. It's actually the law that on the first day of freshers' week at university there has to be a compulsory showing of Withnail and I introduced by the Pro Vice-Chancellor. You are not allowed to skip it and if you are ill you do need to make up for it and watch it in your own time. In theory you are supposed to watch it at least fifty times by the end of the year and then there is a test where you have to be able to shout out lines such as "Monty you terrible cunt" or "We've gone on holiday by mistake" or "Perfumed ponce" at the right times. Most important of course is the scene with Danny and the Camberwell Carrot - to graduate you must be able to recite that scene from beginning to end without any mistakes whatsoever and while doing a passable impression of Danny's voice.
 

version

Warehouse Operative
It's more she's one of those straight women who seem to think being a lesbian means having an uncontrollable attraction to every woman in the world, and the same for gay men.
 
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IdleRich

IdleRich
The 'predatory homosexual' thing feels like it betrays a certain homophobia on Robinson's part.
This is the guy who went on to write a book in which he claims - quite persuasively according to some - to solve the Jack the Ripper mystery.
 

IdleRich

IdleRich
Yesterday watched two films which were very different but both good in their own way... first up was a kinda, I guess you call it Afro-futurist, type film. Set in Rwanda - again kinda, I don't think the name is ever mentioned, and much of it actually occurs in what appears to be some sort of parallel world type space.
Neptune Frost follows two characters steered by their dreams to escape their respective problems; one as a slave in a mine in which his brother is summarily murdered for pausing on the job to daydream, the other victimised for being trans. Their dreams lead them to Digitalis which seems to be a kind of interdimensional temporary autonomous zone peopled by misfits escaping the war and The Authority's blankly masked enforcers.

It's a very beautiful film, extracting the maximum effect from simply having vividly robed people moving through lush greenery, or at night the colours of even the most mundane canteen glow against the dark, all of this added to by the occasional overlaying of computer graphics representing data.

And the soundtrack is a perfect mixture of bleeps, crackles and beautiful human voices - the soundtrack is important of course cos - I shoulda said - it's a musical, but in the least offensive of ways with background characters subtly becoming the chorus quite differently from the usual way in which everyone suddenly drops what they're doing and piles in with irritating gusto.

For me the second half of the film - in which it seems they felt a need to do something with what they have created and thus you get more expiratory and rather stilted dialogue - is not as good as the first where they are just having fun creating stuff and it all just seems to open up naturally. Still, you should definitely watch it I reckon.



EdIt: this trailer gives you a better idea actually

 
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IdleRich

IdleRich
And the other film was totally different; Bull is a very low budget British gangster revenge thing with Neil Maskell as a relentless psychopath brutally murdering his way through the gang of low-rent scumbags who set him on fire and kidnapped his son - seemingly the only thing he cared about in the world.

I would say it was gritty but that doesn't really do it justice. It's the Grim Brittania thread with more machetes and afterwards I realised that it had left me feeling almost depressed. The sordid smallness and ugliness of everything about was extremely effective.

I suppose when you see some mafia don or Colombdian drug lord who will kill people to lead a glamorous lifestyle of mansions and private jets, well, I don't condone it or anything, but it is more understandable than some horrible Scottish boss who has quite literally sold his soul for a detached house in Romford. The idea that people can become so evil for so little gave the film a kind of powerful banality if I can say that.

In contrast to Neptune Frost, the originality of which posed constant challenges of the "what next?" and "how should it end?" type for its creators, the well-trodden nature of Bull's plot arguably meant they were able to tie it up more satisfactorily and completely.

Edit - I would describe Bull as a bit like Dead Man's Shoes - but without the joyously upbeat message that conveyed in every scene - meets, er, another film. But if I say the other film it reminded me of then it will give away the twist ending which apparently caught everyone completely off-guard although I saw it (or something similar) coming a mile off.
 
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DLaurent

Well-known member
People might groan that all I watch is pretty much classic film noir, and they'd be right, but Too Late For Tears reissued as Killer Bait is one of the best and most gripping I've seen for a while. Dan Duryea in a typecast villain role, and Elizabeth Scott as a terrifyingly cunning femme fatale. There is a good quality version on Broken Trout YouTube channel under the title Killer Bait.
 

Corpsey

bandz ahoy
Drag Me To Hell: lots of fun, gross out, ridiculous 4/5 (i've never seen evil dead, might watch it cos its on iplayer)

The Handmaiden: intricate thrilling disturbing romantic erotic porny anti-porn 5/5
 

Corpsey

bandz ahoy
Banshees of Inisherin: funny/sad, beautiful landscapes, colin farrell and brenan gleeson, not sure if it amounts to anything, made me think about cutting off friendships and having been cut off from them 4/5
 

rubberdingyrapids

Well-known member
discussed martin mcdonagh in the other fiilm thread.

im agnostic about ozu but finally found a film of his i really love - his remake of his own early film floating weeds. its totally uncharacteristic of his films in that its got conflict, drama, a sexiness even (!), and violence too. but i totally loved it. his weird framing and other directorial tics and trademarks still bug me a bit but less so. actually, i do like his other films but only ever really in part, more for the themes a lot of the time, i just find his style a bit distancing and off putting at times.

i also saw seven for the first time i think since it came out, and thought it was brilliant. it becomes dissapointing once kevin spacey enters with his creepy killer character, that ending is just so abrupt i cant believe they thought that was good enough, but the visual style (its one of the literally darkest modern films i think ive seen) is tremendous.
 
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