version

Well-known member
Maybe the whole microchip thing isn't that farfetched...
We said, “Well, you know, therapeutics are delivered by syringes.” There’s a lot of polymer therapeutics to replace damaged tissue in the body, or just for enhancements and things like that. “What if we do the unheard of?” People would say, “It’s impossible.” Can we just inject electronic circuits through a needle into the brain, or other tissue, and then connect it, and then monitor? Yes, we can, and that’s where we are today.

It’s really a very simple process. It’s not like a normal electronic probe that you stick into the brain for deep brain stimulation. It’s made on a normal silicon wafer, but we just take this wafer and put a layer, which is ultimately dissolved away, and then just do three layers of lithography where we have polymer layer, then put some metal lines which are inside of that mesh polymer layer, and then put a second layer of polymer on top which seals the metal—except where you have your recording devices—and then dissolve away with this release layer, and you have your material. Then you can suck it up into a syringe. It’s literally almost that simple.

It’s turned out to work much, much better than we originally thought, and some of the reasons are outlined in our original paper a year ago, and then much more so in this paper: That this mesh-like structure, which can be injected because it has size, scale, and mechanical properties very similar to the neural network, or neural tissue, turns out to have no immune response, which is unheard of.
 

IdleRich

IdleRich
What the fuck is gibberish? I can't believe that something so poorly put together can be on actual tv. I think it's supposed to be some sort of conspiracy theory though so I am putting it here.


I reckon that he probably thinks that it's probably Hunter Biden's fault that people somehow got the crazy idea that the US was defeated in Vietnam.
 

Mr. Tea

Shub-Niggurath, Please
This is interesting. Conspiracy theory about Brexit that involves Putin (obvs.) not as one of the conspirators, but as an opponent of the conspirators: an assortment of Libertarian and far-right types, including Charles Koch, a senior Republican strategist, and Austrian neofash leader Jörg Haider.


Not that Putin didn't want Brexit to happen for his own reasons - witness the Petersburg troll farm, Arron Banks's Russian gold interests, etc. - but this is an interesting shift in focus away from his involvement.
 

wild greens

Well-known member
I would like to know what weird telegram group has led to the group of lads trying to stage a coup on Edinburgh castle tonight

Something to do with the magna carta? The internet really shows its worth on days like this
 

Mr. Tea

Shub-Niggurath, Please
Is this some sort of home-grown Scottish version of "Freemen on the Land"/"Sovereign Citizens"? These kinds of legalistic conspiracy theory subcultures are particularly amusing because they're demonstrably bollocks in a way that theories involving ancient secret societies, the supernatural, or highly implausible physics generally aren't. I mean, I can't personally prove that George Bush Jnr didn't order the Twin Towers to be packed with explosives; it just seems totally redundant, given the well known properties of aviation fuel and steel girders that anyone can look up.

But with this kind of stuff, you occasionally get deluded chancers who think it might be a good way to avoid paying some tax or charge that everyone else has to pay, and every single time they take it to court, the adjudicating authority just laughs in their face, dismisses it and orders them to pay costs. So, demonstrably, their conception of how the law "actually works" is total bollocks.
 
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william_kent

Well-known member
Is this some sort of home-grown Scottish version of "Freemen on the Land"/"Sovereign Citizens"? These kinds of legalistic conspiracy theory subcultures

Yeah, they've taken some deleted clause from the Magna Carta that gave some rights to 25 barons and misinterpreted it as applying to them

Clause 61 of the 1215 Magna Carta set out rules for 25 specific barons. It did not allow the general population to rebel, and it was also removed from subsequent versions of the document.

from fullfact.org
 

Mr. Tea

Shub-Niggurath, Please
Yeah, they've taken some deleted clause from the Magna Carta that gave some rights to 25 barons and misinterpreted it as applying to them



from fullfact.org
I was coming to that bit! I'm no legal historian, but it's hardly a secret that Magna Carta dates from five hundred years before the political union of England and Scotland, so whatever dubious weight it may have in 21st century English law obviously does not apply in Scotland because it has never applied there, before you even get into the details of their supposed case, which I'm sure are total horseshit for a dozen other reasons anyway.
 

IdleRich

IdleRich
I was imagining in Goldfinger when he was trying to irradiate all the gold in fort knox so that he controlled virtually all the non-contaminated stuff... but imagine if there was some kind of metal parasite that fed on gold and which could destroy the world's whole gold supply or something.
But gold always seems to me like a safe stock in a sort of medium financial meltdown, it's a place of safety if loads of complex financial instruments come crashing down... but if the financial system itself comes totally apart then what use is a soft, heavy, yellow metal?
 

Clinamenic

θερμοδυναμικός καπιταλιστής
I mean I think western culture has a damn near immutable reverence for gold, and that sort of confidence is really the most important part, in terms of bootstrapping an economy, as far as I can tell.
 

Clinamenic

θερμοδυναμικός καπιταλιστής
I mean I think western culture has a damn near immutable reverence for gold, and that sort of confidence is really the most important part, in terms of bootstrapping an economy, as far as I can tell.
Revered by institutional and anarcho-capitalists alike, no?

Imagine when we get to the point where the elderly grew up alongside bitcoin.
 

Mr. Tea

Shub-Niggurath, Please
Gold was valuable when people in Germany made weird tall, conical hats* out of it 3,000 years ago. I'm pretty sure every culture that has ever known about it, or known how to extract and work it, has fetishized it to some extent. So if some cataclysm reduced our technological basis to something like the bronze age, gold would presumably still be regarded as precious, and someone in possession of a stash of it would be rich. A hard disk full of crypto, not so much.

*gold_hat.jpg
 
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Clinamenic

θερμοδυναμικός καπιταλιστής
I'm less sure about that, given how much Bitcoin alone has already been deified over the last decade. If its about social establishment, it may not matter if its matter.

If we're talking about no-electrical-grid economy, value on a blockchain would become something of a promissory reserve, with the current balance sheet immortalizing the current accounts. Depends on how resilient the internet would be to a major system shock though. Really I don't know the technical stuff there.

If there was no internet access period, across the globe, which I find unlikely, abrupt climate change notwithstanding, then the promise of a blockchain is as good as that of the human you are hearing it from, which defeats the whole purpose.
 

Clinamenic

θερμοδυναμικός καπιταλιστής
But then again I'm unfamiliar with the hardware underpinning the internet, and how many central points of failure there are across these various layers.
 
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