Painting

Corpsey

bandz ahoy
Almost seems too 'obvious' to post on here but I absolutely love this painting.

Old_guitarist_chicago.jpg
 

WashYourHands

Well-known member
One day I hope to stand in front of this, same point about upload differences

B2B9FD93-CDFC-4A56-BDCC-060D7CF9B6F1.jpeg

A83B1205-8BBC-415E-BEDC-720980608AFD.jpeg

A Coil interview picked out that J Balance studied Ernst somewhere for a period before dropping out. Like Spare’s eyes, the landscapes are immeasurably suggestive. Europe After the Rain @suspended is unyielding

549982E9-8456-4A7A-B0A5-E08BE6E0AC7D.jpeg
 

jenks

thread death
Went to see the Dubuffet at the Barbican the other day - reproduction doesn’t do justice to the textures of his work at all.
 

Attachments

  • FB0228A9-D8C0-4FAA-A959-514A216DCA96.jpeg
    FB0228A9-D8C0-4FAA-A959-514A216DCA96.jpeg
    211.2 KB · Views: 6

Corpsey

bandz ahoy
Went to see Paula Rego @ Tate Britain, knowing nothing about her, and wound up really impressed.

It starts out very abstract/collage-y but becomes increasingly figurative but always with an element of surrealism and grotesquerie.

She painted this when she was 16 I think (note the electric drill)

336_ex_ca_paula_rego_interrogation_1950_yes.jpg


This is one of her most famous paintings I think, "The Family"

Rego_fl_The_Family_1988_2_-2.jpg


But my favourite stuff was the portraits she did in pastel, which reminded me of both Degas and Lucien Freud (though much more pointedly extreme and grotesque in places)

3f4c0508a28d24ae8f6e94b631f57403.jpg


Paula-Rego-Dog-Woman.jpg


Interestingly, I read some reviews of the exhibition afterwards and both of them said that the Tate had done her a disservice by emphasising the political/protest aspects of her work. They said that her work is much more mysterious and oblique than that reading suggests, though it certainly contains political elements and a persistent anger directed towards the patriarchal fascist regime of her birthplace, Portugal.

It's just funny how influential those captions can be when you've never encountered an artist before. I was a bit disappointed by the Tate's Rodin exhibition, too, recently – I felt that the captions didn't touch upon any sense of meaning in the art. It was all about process (Which was, tbf, the point of the exhibition).
 

jenks

thread death
That looks good @jenks but since it finishes on Sunday I am almost certain to miss it.
It was a really decent retrospective - well curated. I can’t say I’ve seen many good things at the Barbican but this was definitely worth the visit.
 

jenks

thread death
Went to see Paula Rego @ Tate Britain, knowing nothing about her, and wound up really impressed.

It starts out very abstract/collage-y but becomes increasingly figurative but always with an element of surrealism and grotesquerie.

She painted this when she was 16 I think (note the electric drill)

336_ex_ca_paula_rego_interrogation_1950_yes.jpg


This is one of her most famous paintings I think, "The Family"

Rego_fl_The_Family_1988_2_-2.jpg


But my favourite stuff was the portraits she did in pastel, which reminded me of both Degas and Lucien Freud (though much more pointedly extreme and grotesque in places)

3f4c0508a28d24ae8f6e94b631f57403.jpg


Paula-Rego-Dog-Woman.jpg


Interestingly, I read some reviews of the exhibition afterwards and both of them said that the Tate had done her a disservice by emphasising the political/protest aspects of her work. They said that her work is much more mysterious and oblique than that reading suggests, though it certainly contains political elements and a persistent anger directed towards the patriarchal fascist regime of her birthplace, Portugal.

It's just funny how influential those captions can be when you've never encountered an artist before. I was a bit disappointed by the Tate's Rodin exhibition, too, recently – I felt that the captions didn't touch upon any sense of meaning in the art. It was all about process (Which was, tbf, the point of the exhibition).
Odd about the complaints. Because I would suggest even at her most mysterious she is still very much aware of power and (more to the point) the powerless.
Her work is always very arresting, even in those dream like pictures where things don’t quite fit and create something very disconcerting.
I went to the Rodin museum in Paris many years ago - those big fuck off lumps worked especially well in his garden - the Burghers of Calais has always stuck in my mind from there.
 
Top