Beer And Beer Drinking

luka

Well-known member
A few years ago i lost the ability to drink beer. i just couldn't do it. it wouldn't go down. i was never a big fan anyway. it's gassy, there's too much of it, you have to piss every five minutes, it's very unsexy, doesn't even look attractive, plus, and this is one of the big mysteries in my life, it absolutely smashes me. i can drink a whole bottle of brandy and be more with it than if i'd drunk 4 pints. 6 pints and i'm out of the game, it's all over. i'm also much more likely to be obnoxious. it makes my head cloudy and bleary. the other thing is, it akes my face fat. i get a little mini double chin and my cheek bones get obscured. i just drink spirits now days. i wonder if any one else suffered this misfortune. this is a general beer thread for people who want to discuss beer. scottie, he loves his beer, he always talks about it.


sometimes i might drink those polish ones that recently started appearing in eastend offies a while back, zyweick and that, but thats me trying to be different, ditto nigerian guiness, oh, they're strong too innit, so it's a cheaper way to get smashed.


talk beer here.
 

jenks

thread death
i couldn't do beer at all until i went to work in (what was then czechoslovakia), i ended up in a mining town on the polish border and the only pastime was drinking - seriously nothing else to do - czech beer did for my snake hips and since then i have become a dedicated beer drinker - interestingly(for me) this occured roughly at the same time as i stopped smoking dope.
one question though, why is this on the politics strand - doesn't bother me, just interested
 

scottdisco

rip this joint please
as they say, i heart you so much Luka :D

just going out the door but wanted to be one of the first to respond since you so graciously namechecked me.

i find, these days (well i am an underweight 25), that, unless i'm drinking beer for several hours then about half a dozen jars is a comfortable limit for me too (for a start, the limit is about five or six to stay really appreciative of what i'm drinking, i find).

obviously if you're on an all-dayer or just start late arvo then you can pack loads of beer down before starting on the spirits. but it's important to eat.

Nigerian Guinness is quality, it is strong yeah, about 7.5 or so innit.

i've got to get me some of that but it's hard to come by in pubs a lot of the time (certainly American ones).

let's say, three beers i like a lot, FWIW
Abott
Krombacher
Robinson's Unicorn (Robinson's have about, like, literally 300 hostelries in the Stockport area and then quite a few more in the Manchester area but you don't really see 'em outside a small slice of northwest England; they make good, cheap bitters - this is their Best, 4.2 i believe, just a gorgeous simple quaffable drink - and such and sponsor the football team Stockport County; they do a great mild, Hatters, and a fearsome seasonal beer, Old Tom, eight and a half per cent ABV)

do people like all sorts of beers? or do you stick to lager? cask conditioned stuff?

do you like a nice pils?
do you drink much Belgian beer?
do you drink much African or south American or Asian beer?
American micro-fare?

i only found out the other day why a lot of American beer doesn't have the ABV on the label, incidentally (to do with federal regulations that were only repealed about a dozen years ago).

etc.
quality :)

Jenks
>one question though, why is this on the politics strand - doesn't bother me, just interested
perhaps Luka is thinking of the Workers Beer Company (or whatever they are called) and their Red Wedge politics, you always get them at Glasto
 

luka

Well-known member
wow! scott, you are a beer genius! i've never heard of any of those beers!

interested to see you drink bitter. that's almost unheard of in my part of the world, at least for people our age. is it common up north? i find it totally unpalettable. an aquired taste presumably, but not one i'm willing to suffer to aquire. any other bitter drinkers? if so state your age and the place you live and the place you were brought up. lager is the default option, but so often too bland for words. maybe in summer, if it's extra cold. so long as there's crisps to go with it.

it's on the politics bit for two reasons
1)there's not a food and drink section. (i think i'll start my cheese thread on the nature section)
2)i don't like the politics threads. they get on my nerves for all sorts of reasons, shoulder chips among them.
 

egg

Dumpy's Rusty Nut
luka said:
interested to see you drink bitter. ... is it common up north? i find it totally unpalettable.
i love a Bishop's Finger. v common in sussex.
 
S

simon silverdollar

Guest
what's that jamaican stout called? 'dragon' or something? it's about 12%. it's like guiness but it really fucks you up. it's quite fun.

i'm from the north west originally, right next door to scott, and bitter/real ale drinking is pretty common among the youth. i'm totally a bitter fan. it's the best consumable substance this country has ever produced- one of the few things that britain does better than almost anywhere else.
some of my favourites:
adnam's broadside [the top boy of beers]
green king indian pale ale
black sheep [unusual cuz it's quite sharp and acidic]
old peculiar [cuz it is]
young's double chocolate stout [this should be disgusting but it's delicious.
old porter [can't remember who does this one- i think it's a london brewery tho.]
old speckled hen.

we'll have to get together for another pub session, scott.
 
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xero

was minusone
i used to drink bitter as a yoot (18 odd years ago, brighton) but switched to lager after one too many eggy pints. Why is it that bitter is more prone to this? - you very occasionally get it with lager but I remember it being really common with bitter. The beer would smell faintly eggy like it had gone off and tasted funny as well. You felt ill quicker than if you were drinking kosher stuff. A lot of people didn't even notice it (i suppose if you were on your 10th it didn't make much odds) is it something to do with dirty pipes? if so then the pipes of pubs in brighton in the eighties must have been amongst the dirtiest in the land. But Harveys is a good beer from that neck of the woods if it ain't off.
 

fldsfslmn

excremental futurism
Of all the threads to stumble upon while I'm trying to dramatically curtail my drinking. I'm so thirsty now.

Where I live, the popular local beer is a wheat ale called Grasshopper. Ale is a bit of a misnomer in this case; it's piss-coloured, HIGHLY fizzy, and served ice cold. The pint is served with a wedge of lemon, which is more of an irritation than an appreciated flavour accessory for most. Ashtrays around here are always full of lemon wedges.

Here in the province of Alberta, we have one of those oil-mad, privatize-everything, eat-the-poor styles of government. They're more likely to fund new horse-racing initatives than put money into social programs. The noted ties between B1g R0ck and the Tory party have always been at the back of my mind, but I recently decided to quit drinking their products for good.*

http://www.canoe.ca/NewsStand/Columnists/Calgary/Michael_Platt/2004/11/18/719086.html (more about provincial politics and brewing, sorry it's neither exciting nor relevant to anyone who doesn't already live here)

*I did actually have a can of their Traditional Ale over Christmas, but I didn't pay for it. Should a boycott be total, or merely economic?
 

scottdisco

rip this joint please
another rambling post...

actually fldsfslmn (i think you're alright just on the economic boycott), that article you linked to is very, very interesting (i've just mentioned it on my blog!).

do you like Grasshopper? i'd be very interested in your views, especially as i've never had it.

skimming over provincial Canadian taxation, i feel something we can surely all agree on is that the main products from both Molson and Labatts are piss-poor (Labatt Blue is fucking appalling). i did a google just now and it's no surprise that Labatt has a deal with the Budweiser (there's a bloke at work who slags off my mate for liking Oranjeboom and maintains Budweiser is preferable - now i'm not actually an Oranjeboom fan myself but really, c'mon...) people to distribute Bud north of the United States border. one shabby turn deserves another... ...perhaps there are good things from Labatts that they brew up now and again but really...

i know what minusone (i have never heard of Harveys so now want some!) means about bad pints but i suppose that is just down to if the publican knows how to keep it. the Cask Marque organisation is certainly something i wish i'd known about during my undergraduate days (student unions are notorious for purchasing the end-of- slops from brewery runs, to keep their beer prices so cheap).
http://www.cask-marque.co.uk/what_is_cask_ale.html

as for egg and Bishop's Finger, god that's so lovely. Bishop's Finger is just quality, there's no other word for it. the Shepherd Neame brewery is actually very well thought of up my way (north-west, like Simon). i used to work for the RAC in Manchester and a sales colleague was responsible for the breakdown motor insurance for the Neame fleet of vehicles.
we were all well excited about that one :eek:

i also agree with Si about British cask ale being the finest consumable substance Britain has ever done (Adnams is on the Suffolk coast and their stuff is quite, quite brilliant: the design on their bottles is excellent as a matter of fact). in fact i think Britain is the second finest beer-producing nation on earth (you'd get very few arguments against Belgium, but i think the preponderance of cask-conditioned ale in Britain puts it above other top boy nations like the Dutch, the Germans, the Czechs, etc.) - not that many countries around the world don't produce brilliant beer ('cause they do), but i'm just saying, is all.

yeah that Jamaican stout that Si mentions, it is well strong (think it's about 8?). i know of few places where you can get it at the bar but there again i drink in London once in a blue moon. actually without sounding overly nationalistic or anything like that, i reckon London might be the finest drinking city on earth.
well actually it's probably somewhere in Belgium all things considered (if not Brussels, maybe Antwerp or Bruges) but my half-arsed thesis runs thus:

- London is the centre of British drinking and so all the lovely lovely ales these isles produce can usually be found in London, at a pinch.
- London is also, of course, one of the most cosmopolitan towns on earth and so you can naturally find just about any global cuisine type there and pretty much most booze too, i shouldn't wonder (you can certainly get a lot of decent European, Asian, African and American beer in London).
- although many, many countries produce world-class beer, i think pretty much the best nations for beer production are a handful in continental Europe (those mentioned above, Austria, the Slovaks, etc.) and Britain and Ireland (the USA is the exception to this, but it's no surprise the USA brews so many great albeit sometimes hard-to-find beers, solely given the huge American population).
- so, therefore, all this wonderful beery goodness sort of commingles in London and so, voila!
- i suppose British licensing laws might sink my thesis.

what does anyone think?

i think mpc can drink more Red Stripe than me :eek:

P.S.
Simon, deffo to the sesh. :)
P.P.S.
i am taking Luka's question about bitter and the north of England so seriously i will give it a post of its own.
 

scottdisco

rip this joint please
bitter etc

>interested to see you drink bitter. that's almost unheard of in my part of the world, at least for people our age. is it common up north?

can i just say before i forget that, in the UK, the worst pints i have ever had have been bitters. but also real ale has provided my most enjoyable drinking as well (i specify the UK as i have drunk a fair bit across quite a few states in the USA and endured some truly shocking beer, not least their mainstream beers, as well as Guinness that has been no better than slops).

but off the top of my head the worst beer i've ever had in the UK has been a dire pint of Theakstons Best (bitter) in a Birmingham Wetherspoons (Theakstons do Old Peculier that Simon mentions, which can be a sublime experience if it's kept well), an awful pint of Marstons Pedigree in my crappy estate local, and a Boddington's that a mate had in (funnily enough) a Manc 'Spoons (there again, 'Spoons are like student unions in how they manage to be so cheap with their ale). oh and a Guinness in Yorkshire once (Featherstone, it was poured like it was lager!).
oh Beamish Red used to be hit and miss back in the day (is that discontinued now? i used to switch between Beamish Red and Beamish Black and then one day never saw the Red again, and then from one day never saw Black again either).

so i'm certainly not under any illusions that bitter can be truly fucking depressingly shite, a truly awful tasting experience when it is bad.

but yeah Luka like Simon says i guess bitter is just cheaper up here (i believe that Lancashire including Greater Manchester is consistently said to be the cheapest region in Britain for the average price of a pint, overall, followed then by Nottinghamshire and Cheshire, i think) so that helps.
also the midlands and north do produce a lot of nice real ale.
i can't quite speak for Si as he grew up nearer Liverpool (you get some good ales round there) but growing up in Manchester means you are blessed for cask as there are four local major independent family brewers (and about another 15 or so very good quality micro-brewers in the Manc conurbation), that all keep prices relatively low (i think it's the cheapest city for drinking, overall; i mean you can find discounted social clubs and stuff all over the place that do raey cheap scoops but i think pound for pound Mcr is the cheapest town in the country for a pint) and all manage to knock out high quality bitters and such (they are Holts, Lees, Hydes and the aforementioned Robinson's of Stockport). they've all got shit loads of boozers in the Mcr area but not much at all further afield, so you can get a good feel for a decent bitter round our way before you are necessarily put off bitter by one too many bad pints of Worthington's or John Smiths Extra Smooth (the big-name caskflow bitters like those are pretty poor imo and that's being tactful, all things considered, although i'll drink 'em :p ).

P.S.
Boddies used to be pretty crap but it had a revamp a bit ago (a year or two) and it's a lot better tasting now. of course they (Interbrew, the owners, who are also responsible for the British taste for Stella) are moving production from Mcr to Preston and south Wales, so that's that up the spout... ...there was some blindfolded taste-test the local rag did (it was all legit, no media stunt) and about it was 80 or 90% (alright maybe as low as 70% but it was at least that figure, so quite emphatic, in all honesty) of testers tasted the difference between Boddies that was already getting pumped out in Preston and Wales, and the Manc stuff, preferring the original (it's all to do, they say, with a spring that runs underneath the Strangeways brewery on the north edge of town).
it's a shame that it's going as Boddies genuinely is like a cup of tea round Mcr but i'd be far more upset if Holts or Lees or Robis went under.
 

xero

was minusone
scottdisco said:
- i suppose British licensing laws might sink my thesis.

these are in the midst of change although the media currently giving voice to everyone who'd like to derail the process :mad:
 

scottdisco

rip this joint please
minusone:
>these are in the midst of change although the media currently giving voice to everyone who'd like to derail the process

tru dat ;)

so minusone what is Harveys like (i found their website which seems quite nice)?
what is the average price of a pint?

i have never been to Brighton, not even for clubbing, can you tell us of some decent boozers in the town centre?
etc.

cheers.
 

egg

Dumpy's Rusty Nut
scottdisco said:
i have never been to Brighton, not even for clubbing, can you tell us of some decent boozers in the town centre?
etc.

cheers.
hm if you are coming to brighton you might as well go on to lewes which is the home of harveys and has some excellent establishments. brighton town centre is a bit 'pants' imo. hastings has possibly more pubs than people, more hardened drinkers and better scenery.

in fact why not wander by train or with chauffeur along the sussex coast taking in all three, as you will find some excellent real ale along the way. a driver would be best as you could stop at all the places in between off the a27 like the giants rest and sussex ox.
 

xero

was minusone
egg said:
hm if you are coming to brighton you might as well go on to lewes which is the home of harveys and has some excellent establishments. brighton town centre is a bit 'pants' imo. hastings has possibly more pubs than people, more hardened drinkers and better scenery.

in fact why not wander by train or with chauffeur along the sussex coast taking in all three, as you will find some excellent real ale along the way. a driver would be best as you could stop at all the places in between off the a27 like the giants rest and sussex ox.

brighton has a few decent boozers, more than most areas of london. But they are fast being taken over and gatroized - try trafalgar street, it's on the edge of the 'happening' centre so has changed slower. Also the heart & hand in north road has always been a bit rock'n'roll partly cos it has a decent jukebox. Mind you I haven't spent much time there in recent years so things might have shifted. Prices are obscene just as bad as anywhere else in this country, or worse

http://www.harveys.org.uk/

sussex ox! used to play in their garden as a young-un
 
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sufi

lala
well, me i'm really not a drinker, you know i'm zoot&bifterite, & if i drink i'm better on spirits or stout, at least for the first couple, & by then i'm away on the rampage & it's too late to care....
anyway, here's me 2p:

singha.JPG
a lot of african & asian lager imho seems to have a lot of ethanol or something, altho
188.jpg
is nae bad, especially the xport, tastes like bananas or coconut to me? mmmm


recently been seeing melotti around the place, from the eritrean brewery who also do lovely rhum, arak & gin
melotti.jpg

that said, ethiopian traditional beer is good too, they have tej - made of honey (like mead) which you can get in london, and tella which is like stout

desnoe_0.jpg
lush

(dunno if it was D&G, but there used to be this great jamaican alcoholic ginger beer called REDRAW, which was wickedly spicy, and dyed yer gob red, ain't seen itt about for ages, i think it got phased out by alcopops - shame)


yewkay beerz:

stella.jpg
fuking rotten man - nasty nasty toxic beer, responsible for the decline in drinking culture, death of saturday nights, rant rant,
no wonder they call it the wife-beater :mad: :( yuk
gimme a nice
desnoe_1.jpg
(brewed in bedford), ta very much.
image.jpg

nice pint o bass that 's another matter - anyone who say they don't like bitter should try it (....served by the jug, upstairs in the star...) mmmm creamy, look for the red triangle

... reckon rewch'll be along in a bit to recount a few tales of old tom....
 

turtles

in the sea
Ahh, beer. Personal expereince seems rather contrary to some people's here, in that I could drink beer all day and not really get too smashed. Though peeing is an issue. Not to mention the beer shits the next day...

As for the canadian beer scene, agreed that labat blue and moslon canadian are pretty dreadful, especially blue. One of the most terrifying beer experiences was going to montreal this summer and finding that the popular beers were blue dry (a stronger version of blue) and molson ex. my god they were terrible.

Round Vancouver way, we do drink some Big Rock, though I think it's also a lot of Okanagan Springs (Pale Ale and Lager) and lots of Granville Island Brewery (Lager, and oooh the hefewiesen they make! so good!) as well as Sleeman's Honey Lager. Though of course Canadian is omnipresent...also, I like Stella! But maybe that's cuz my dad's german, so I was raised on stuff like Warsteiner, which I aslo quite like.

Lastly, I knew an engineer who used to work designing malt-houses (i think that's what they're called), the pre-brewery part of the beer operation. Anyway, he swore that beers like bud and miller genuine draft and such were made with rice instead of barley. Anyone care to confirm/deny?
 

scottdisco

rip this joint please
egg:
>in fact why not wander by train or with chauffeur along the sussex coast taking in all three, as you will find some excellent real ale along the >way. a driver would be best as you could stop at all the places in between off the a27 like the giants rest and sussex ox.

excellent, excellent. i'll have my man Cookie make up a list and we'll be off :D
Hastings sounds like a laff, certainly if it's anything like Dover ["six pints of bitter please, because we're northern"].
the heart & hand sounds decent btw minusone :)
incidentally i have a pal from Bournemouth who is forever complaining about the disgraceful state of near-three-notes pints round his way. mind you, Badger ales are the scoopage of choice in that neck of the woods so it can't be all bad (except when it's blowing up a Force 8 gale at Poole harbour and you're trying to change pubs, sez my correspondent).

loved sufi's visuals post.
it's hard to get African beer in the Mcr pretty much fullstop apart from in restaurants like Out of Africa and the like; there are also only literally three African eating/drinking establishments AFAIK (AFAIK does not count for much in this case, admittedly) in the entire city (there are a lot of Afro-Caribbean eateries and caffs and whatnot). perhaps i should investigate me some tej or tella whilst in Chicago, as there are enough Ethiopian scranneries round here.

i do like Singha me, oh yes.
all the really big Asian beer names (in UK high-street terms i mean) i wuv, Tiger, Cobra, especially Tsingtao which i really am loving.

i must say i cannot really get with the Bass programme.
i don't rate it that much, i must be honest, and i've certainly been on the piss in Burton, so i must be missing something. most tastes have to be acquired and i certainly respect Burton's ale histories, so i dunno. it's another one i have chalked down in a mental notebook.
the thing that strikes me as strange(ish) about Bass is it is very popular in the USA, marketed well over here, slick website, etc. (they seem to go for the merrie olde Englande thing).
i've tried it enough times in the USA out of interest and i can honestly say, my prejudices apart (i think!), it doesn't seem to travel very well (well that's stating the obvious, as what Brit-ale does).
so i'm a bit mystified, in all honesty.
just on the America loves it side of things, i mean.
still, i know Anglophilia can be quite a big thing right.

bipedaldave:
>Ahh, beer. Personal expereince seems rather contrary to some people's here, in that I could drink beer all day and not really get too >smashed. Though peeing is an issue. Not to mention the beer shits the next day...

beer trots can be appalling with some bitters, that's for sure :eek:
if you drink beer all day you'll not get smashed no, that's right, cause the all-dayer thing comes into effect, and you just boss it.

Montreal is a surprise.

i want to ask if there is a difference in, say, north American and British drinking culture, in terms of speed and whatnot. i was at a Indiana brewpub once and tried three pints of three of their different ales (an IPA at about 6% was the best) over about an hour (i ate lunch too). when i went to order the third drink the waitress made a crack about my double-bagging (or double-handing or something) the beer.
i was all 'nah, just wanting to try your fine wares, and this is normal speed back home'.
i mean, weird huh?!
perhaps that says more about the Midwest than anything else...

bipedaldave:
>Lastly, I knew an engineer who used to work designing malt-houses (i think that's what they're called), the pre-brewery part of the beer >operation. Anyway, he swore that beers like bud and miller genuine draft and such were made with rice instead of barley. Anyone care to >confirm/deny?

Bud certainly has rice added to it, for crunch (i remember reading some piece once where the St Louis baseball team the Cards had their guys squeezing cups of rice for pitching practice to strengthen fists and whatnot but it was a commercial tie-in with Anheuser-Busch) or whatnot and to help the flavour zip along (or so i believe), so perhaps Miller-styles are the same?
i don't know, but wouldn't be surprised.
Budweiser and Miller beers all have that very crisp taste. in fact i just checked the Bud site now (cause i'm sad) and it makes a virtue of their addition of rice to the process ('not all breweries do this' etc.)
so in the case of Bud it's just an addition (there is still barley involved). i dunno about Miller. merely generalising in a very sloppy manner, i wouldn't be surprised, cause like i say i guess MGD and Bud etc. all taste fairly similar, i.e., i mean in that extremely crisp and clean manner.

btw, merely on name alone, Okanagan Springs sounds divine. is that a town in Vancouver Island or something?

one of the Freaky Trigger people called Warsteiner Warstarter the other day, which i'd never heard before. i like it :D

Stella actually seems esteemed highly in the USA (i'm assuming perhaps similar in Canada?), well in my very limited experience. well a lot more highly than in the UK (Americans who don't know of the wifebeater nickname - given what a 'wifebeater' is in the US - are amused when informed, in my experience) is what i mean.
i mean, it's a competent lager innit with a bit of the ol' self-fulfilling-prophecy in the 'causes balloonery stakes'. out of the big names Krony b is deffo preferable, although i must admit i'd probably strike out for Artois over Carling, Carlsberg, Harp, Fosters, etc.
but that ain't saying much is it?
actually Carling over Stella, not sure about Carlsberg.
as for Harp, it's nice enough but stick to the stouts, Arthur.

perhaps - as i say, this could be my very partial reading - wifebeater's relative critical popularity this side of the pond is down to a general lack of decent continental European lagers outside of specialist brewpubs or German/Belgian-styled bars?

sorry to bang on, but it really does interest me.
 

fldsfslmn

excremental futurism
scottdisco said:
actually fldsfslmn (i think you're alright just on the economic boycott), that article you linked to is very, very interesting (i've just mentioned it on my blog!).
The article I referenced was actually the wrong one (sorry!). I meant to link to an article from the Edm0nton Journal (which I couldn't find) that mentions the same statistics, but doesn't end up feeding right back into the hands of the C0nservative Party of Alberta. The Journal article cites another upstart Calgary brewer, Mountain Crest, who doesn't appear to be benefitting from these "tax breaks." Like the Sun article, the Journal reminds readers of Kle1n's friendship with B1g R0ck boss Ed McNa1ly, but in the Journal it is not glossed over. The Journal also reminds readers that Kle1n's daughter is a high-ranking executive at B1g R0ck.

I'm quite certain that Alley Kat, an Edmonton-based brewer, has been seeing none of these benefits. Alley Kat, "tax breaks" aside, has been hastening its own demise by refusing to produce and market an instantly recognizable brand for their lager. "Charlie Flint's Original Lager" sounds like you need a handlebar moustache to enjoy, and it's sold practically nowhere. It's not all bad branding, however, and their Aprikat -- an apricot lager, if you can believe it -- is an absolute coup, but unfortunately it's far too light and sweet to be appealing at any time other than the two months of the year where Albertan weather is warm.

The problem is that Edmonton elects practically NO Conservative members to the Legislature. You can see where this is going, right?

Well, here comes a hopeful gentleman. The full text from this article can be found, courtesy of the CBC, at http://edmonton.cbc.ca/regional/servlet/View?filename=ed-beer-20041230.

CBC said:
Edmonton - An Edmonton businessman is hoping to go head-to-head with Calgary's Big Rock Brewery with his own homegrown quality ale.
Todd Gajek, the brains behind Maverick Supreme Lager, says he's been brewing the idea of an Edmonton-based beer company for four years now.
He says that dream will come to fruition in April when the doors to his microbrewery open at the old Cigar Factory located in downtown Edmonton. Gajek says he wanted to give his company high visibility, which is why he chose downtown.
"We're going to encase the whole thing in glass, so as you're walking by or driving by you can see the whole brewing process at a single glance," he said. [Joke's on him, nobody goes to downtown Edmonton! --fldsfslmn]
Gajek is originally from Calgary so is well aware of the competition he'll be facing from Big Rock. He hopes his own specialty brew will be able to chip away at the market share and eventually become a tourist attraction.
He says the brewery will focus on just one beer, the Maverick Supreme Lager, aged an extra 45 days near freezing temperatures.
Well, I like the idea of of focussing on the lager first, which is what Albertans mainly drink. But Maverick Supreme? I might as well just stop shaving right now...

scottdisco said:
do you like Grasshopper? i'd be very interested in your views, especially as i've never had it.
It's like a pale ale (in terms of flavour and body), but with a more golden tint. And as I mentioned before, it's highly, highly carbonated. The hangovers are horrific, and the smell of lemon juice on my hands in the morning is enough to make me throw up.

scottdisco said:
skimming over provincial Canadian taxation, i feel something we can surely all agree on is that the main products from both Molson and Labatts are piss-poor (Labatt Blue is fucking appalling).
Yes.
 
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