Benny B

Well-known member
A riverside bar sounds nice.

I've just come in from the bar but fuck it, think I'm gonna go straight back out again
 

Benny B

Well-known member
In the centre but I'd have to get a bus. I'll be walking literally 10 metres down the street.

That weird red dust has fucked off now, a bit of sun poking through the clouds for the first time in a week. Irresistible
 

shakahislop

Well-known member
had a lager in a can that basically tasted like a shandy at a bar last night. never seen that before. it was $5 though, cheap for nyc.

we sat on the street and became involved in some kind of weird world that i think is centered on tompkins squre park, where some pretty messy homeless people and a group of not homeless 18 year old girls seem to hang out and know each other quite well. the girls had dressed one of the homeless guys up in a santa outfit, and they showed us a photo of where he had shat himself. everyone seemed to be mates though and it seemed good natured.
 

IdleRich

IdleRich
I do tend to prefer drinking at home because that way I can listen to music I like and chuckle at how clever and witty my thoughts are in peace

I've been to a few pubs since the move and my main reflection is there's:

-less of a gakky mood than in London. You really notice how gakky London pubs are when you're not around them anymore

-almost as a contradiction to the first point, more people talk to you. Not keen on this at all of course.
One time we went to visit my parents and went to a pub and this guy came up and said "Are you from London?" and we said "yes" and he said "yeah we'd been talking about it, we all knew you were from London".
 

Mr. Tea

Shub-Niggurath, Please
One time we went to visit my parents and went to a pub and this guy came up and said "Are you from London?" and we said "yes" and he said "yeah we'd been talking about it, we all knew you were from London".
No doubt they were in awe of the sophistication and urbanity of your conversation. Was the guy clutching his hat in both hands as he addressed you?
 

shakahislop

Well-known member
used to have this in the provinces. in brighton it was always pretty clear who had come down from london for the day. different way of dressing, cleaner, tidier, more expensive hair. it also happened in the village when people would move to london and then come back at the weekend, subtle but noticeable changes in appearance. in the same way that it's pretty easy in NYC to notice tourists from other bits of America.
 

IdleRich

IdleRich
Are they what they call bridge and tunnellers, or is that only for people who live near to but outside of the actual city?
 

Leo

Well-known member
Are they what they call bridge and tunnellers, or is that only for people who live near to but outside of the actual city?

yeah, that's just people in the NYC metro area, from New Jersey/Connecticut/Long Island (aka, lawn guyland)
 
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sufi

lala
used to have this in the provinces. in brighton it was always pretty clear who had come down from london for the day. different way of dressing, cleaner, tidier, more expensive hair. it also happened in the village when people would move to london and then come back at the weekend, subtle but noticeable changes in appearance. in the same way that it's pretty easy in NYC to notice tourists from other bits of America.
& Us Londoners can tell exactly how long you parochials have been in the city by your attire and attitude
 
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